Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Timing: Is Task Order Important?

Presenter Information

Megan PopeFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Department

Faculty Mentor

Breanna Studenka

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Event timing refers to movements that utilize an internal clock whereas emergent timing refers to movements that do not (Robertson et al., 1999; Zelaznik et al., 2002). Although, typically, these two modes of timing are thought of as mutually exclusive, some evidence suggests that experience with event timing might lead to its use during a typically emergently timed task. Significant correlations were found between tapping and circle drawing when circle drawing followed several trials of tapping (Studenka et al., 2012; Zelaznik & Rosenbaum, 2010). In addition, musicians with more general practice using event timing exhibited a correlation between tapping and circle drawing (Baer et al., 2013), suggesting that prolonged practice at event timing may prime a person to its use during a typically emergently timed task. Attention and memory differences between young and old also show differences in the mode of timing processes (Turgeon, Lustig, Meck, 2016). The aim of these experiments was to determine if experience with one mode of timing influenced the mode of timing adopted on a subsequent task. Four experiments were conducted, two with a younger (18-25) and two with an older (55-100) population. For one set of experiments, participants performed one block of circle drawing as a baseline, then six blocks of tapping, followed by a final block of circle drawing. For the other set of experiments, participants performed one block of tapping as a baseline, then six blocks of circle drawing, followed by a final block of tapping. Lag one autocorrelations were calculated for each block of trials as a measure of the use of event timing. We hypothesized that acute experience with event timing would bias an individual to use event timing. We further hypothesized that experience with emergent timing would bias an individual to use non-event timing. Neither hypothesis was supported; instead we support the robustness of event and emergent timing as separate timing modes.

Location

South Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Timing: Is Task Order Important?

South Atrium

Event timing refers to movements that utilize an internal clock whereas emergent timing refers to movements that do not (Robertson et al., 1999; Zelaznik et al., 2002). Although, typically, these two modes of timing are thought of as mutually exclusive, some evidence suggests that experience with event timing might lead to its use during a typically emergently timed task. Significant correlations were found between tapping and circle drawing when circle drawing followed several trials of tapping (Studenka et al., 2012; Zelaznik & Rosenbaum, 2010). In addition, musicians with more general practice using event timing exhibited a correlation between tapping and circle drawing (Baer et al., 2013), suggesting that prolonged practice at event timing may prime a person to its use during a typically emergently timed task. Attention and memory differences between young and old also show differences in the mode of timing processes (Turgeon, Lustig, Meck, 2016). The aim of these experiments was to determine if experience with one mode of timing influenced the mode of timing adopted on a subsequent task. Four experiments were conducted, two with a younger (18-25) and two with an older (55-100) population. For one set of experiments, participants performed one block of circle drawing as a baseline, then six blocks of tapping, followed by a final block of circle drawing. For the other set of experiments, participants performed one block of tapping as a baseline, then six blocks of circle drawing, followed by a final block of tapping. Lag one autocorrelations were calculated for each block of trials as a measure of the use of event timing. We hypothesized that acute experience with event timing would bias an individual to use event timing. We further hypothesized that experience with emergent timing would bias an individual to use non-event timing. Neither hypothesis was supported; instead we support the robustness of event and emergent timing as separate timing modes.