Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Saint George slaying the Dragon

Class

Article

College

Caine College of the Arts

Faculty Mentor

Alexa Sand

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

This research will examine the origins of the cult of Saint George in late medieval England, and will focus in particular on pilgrimage badges depicting the legend of Saint George and the Dragon. How did this saint become so important in England even though he was not an English saint, and what was the origin of the story of slaying the dragon and of George’s beheading? Saint George’s story is mythical, and the stories about his life seem unreal, as if he never really existed, but was instead a symbol of ideas in which the faithful trusted. I will examine the representation of George in late-medieval English pilgrim badges, asking where they were produced and for whom. Although some historical work has been done on the cult of Saint George in England, very little is known about the inexpensive but popular badges that pilgrims to his shrine or shrines collected. It is my goal to connect the historical picture to these small but significant traces of material culture.

Location

The North Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 1:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 12:00 PM Apr 12th, 1:15 PM

Saint George slaying the Dragon

The North Atrium

This research will examine the origins of the cult of Saint George in late medieval England, and will focus in particular on pilgrimage badges depicting the legend of Saint George and the Dragon. How did this saint become so important in England even though he was not an English saint, and what was the origin of the story of slaying the dragon and of George’s beheading? Saint George’s story is mythical, and the stories about his life seem unreal, as if he never really existed, but was instead a symbol of ideas in which the faithful trusted. I will examine the representation of George in late-medieval English pilgrim badges, asking where they were produced and for whom. Although some historical work has been done on the cult of Saint George in England, very little is known about the inexpensive but popular badges that pilgrims to his shrine or shrines collected. It is my goal to connect the historical picture to these small but significant traces of material culture.