Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Advanced Mathematical Approaches for Modeling Animal Movement through Landscapes

Class

Article

College

College of Science

Faculty Mentor

Thomas Edwards

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

An important component of population ecology is understanding the impact on animal movement. Modeling animal movement helps us understand how this impact manifests itself in animal behavior and habitat selection as well as human impact on wildlife. Correlated movement and heterogeneous landscapes add complexity to these models and are often neglected. How do landscape features condition population movement and habitat choice? I answer this question by showing that motility does play a significant role in population dynamics. The ecological telegrapher's equation (ETE) incorporates both variable landscape and correlated movement. The solution to the ETE predicts the PDF of future locations. I use this PDF in a maximum likelihood process to parameterize the ETE with simulated data. In this work, I develop code to generate test data by simulating trajectories with a correlated random walk on a simulated terrain. I determine the accuracy of the MLE procedure by parameterizing the ETE with the simulated data and comparing with the assigned values in the simulated landscape. Applying the same MLE procedure to actual telemetry data from mule deer in Southern Utah will yield the impact of different landscape types on mule deer.

Location

Room 204

Start Date

4-12-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 4:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Advanced Mathematical Approaches for Modeling Animal Movement through Landscapes

Room 204

An important component of population ecology is understanding the impact on animal movement. Modeling animal movement helps us understand how this impact manifests itself in animal behavior and habitat selection as well as human impact on wildlife. Correlated movement and heterogeneous landscapes add complexity to these models and are often neglected. How do landscape features condition population movement and habitat choice? I answer this question by showing that motility does play a significant role in population dynamics. The ecological telegrapher's equation (ETE) incorporates both variable landscape and correlated movement. The solution to the ETE predicts the PDF of future locations. I use this PDF in a maximum likelihood process to parameterize the ETE with simulated data. In this work, I develop code to generate test data by simulating trajectories with a correlated random walk on a simulated terrain. I determine the accuracy of the MLE procedure by parameterizing the ETE with the simulated data and comparing with the assigned values in the simulated landscape. Applying the same MLE procedure to actual telemetry data from mule deer in Southern Utah will yield the impact of different landscape types on mule deer.