Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Carbon Pricing in the Private Sector: How the Science, and Politics, of Carbon Pricing and Climate Change Influence Business Strategy

Class

Article

College

Jon M. Huntsman School of Business

Faculty Mentor

Chris Fawson

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Economist Michael Greenstone called the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) “the most important figure you’ve never heard of”. The EPA defines the SCC as “an estimate of the economic damages associated with a small increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, conventionally one metric ton, in a given year.” The dollar figure assigned therefore represents “the value of damages avoided for a small emission reduction (i.e. the benefit of a CO2 reduction).” The current dollar value has different estimates in each state and within each company. The process of calculating the SCC is immensely complex and relies on numerous variables that are highly disputed by scientists, private interest groups and policy makers. Our purpose is to examine motives and trends behind public and private companies using SCC estimates.

Location

The North Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 10:15 AM

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:15 AM

Carbon Pricing in the Private Sector: How the Science, and Politics, of Carbon Pricing and Climate Change Influence Business Strategy

The North Atrium

Economist Michael Greenstone called the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) “the most important figure you’ve never heard of”. The EPA defines the SCC as “an estimate of the economic damages associated with a small increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, conventionally one metric ton, in a given year.” The dollar figure assigned therefore represents “the value of damages avoided for a small emission reduction (i.e. the benefit of a CO2 reduction).” The current dollar value has different estimates in each state and within each company. The process of calculating the SCC is immensely complex and relies on numerous variables that are highly disputed by scientists, private interest groups and policy makers. Our purpose is to examine motives and trends behind public and private companies using SCC estimates.