Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Historia Naturae, Maxime Peregrinae

Class

Article

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Mentor

Susan Cogan

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

We will be presenting our poster on Historia Natvrae, Maxime Peregrinae (Natural History of the Americas) by Juan Eusebio Nieremberg. Nieremberg, a Spanish Jesuit, wrote the book in 1635. Our focus for this research assignment will be to determine the accuracy and validity of Nieremberg’s claims. Nieremberg traveled to the Americas and recorded first-hand accounts of native plants and animals, but several creatures in his novel were created out of superstition. This historical treatise systematically categorizes the plants and animals of North and South America, studying Mexico in particular. It depicts numerous native plants and describes their medicinal properties, some of which maintain relevance today. The book includes detailed wood prints of life in the New World, such as manatees, coyotes, and armadillos, just to name a few. Nieremberg’s research was extensive, including the diets and behaviors of the creatures. Our preliminary investigation indicates that while some of Nieremberg’s claims are valid, many are untrue or exaggerated. Historia Natvrae, Maxime Peregrinae was a monumental book because Nieremberg’s research brought a crucial understanding of natural medicine across the globe. Aside from the medicinal guidelines, Nieremberg’s account served as a form of entertainment for Europeans who were fascinated by tales of the New World. We hypothesize that some of the creatures listed in the book were exaggerated to increase public appeal not only for the New World, but for Nieremberg’s own literary works. This work is significant even in the modern day because it includes species that are still present in the modern world, as well as gives insight into species that are now extinct. We would like to analyze Nieremberg’s depiction of life in the New World to develop an understanding that we hope to present at the Student Research Symposium.

Location

The South Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 1:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 12:00 PM Apr 12th, 1:15 PM

Historia Naturae, Maxime Peregrinae

The South Atrium

We will be presenting our poster on Historia Natvrae, Maxime Peregrinae (Natural History of the Americas) by Juan Eusebio Nieremberg. Nieremberg, a Spanish Jesuit, wrote the book in 1635. Our focus for this research assignment will be to determine the accuracy and validity of Nieremberg’s claims. Nieremberg traveled to the Americas and recorded first-hand accounts of native plants and animals, but several creatures in his novel were created out of superstition. This historical treatise systematically categorizes the plants and animals of North and South America, studying Mexico in particular. It depicts numerous native plants and describes their medicinal properties, some of which maintain relevance today. The book includes detailed wood prints of life in the New World, such as manatees, coyotes, and armadillos, just to name a few. Nieremberg’s research was extensive, including the diets and behaviors of the creatures. Our preliminary investigation indicates that while some of Nieremberg’s claims are valid, many are untrue or exaggerated. Historia Natvrae, Maxime Peregrinae was a monumental book because Nieremberg’s research brought a crucial understanding of natural medicine across the globe. Aside from the medicinal guidelines, Nieremberg’s account served as a form of entertainment for Europeans who were fascinated by tales of the New World. We hypothesize that some of the creatures listed in the book were exaggerated to increase public appeal not only for the New World, but for Nieremberg’s own literary works. This work is significant even in the modern day because it includes species that are still present in the modern world, as well as gives insight into species that are now extinct. We would like to analyze Nieremberg’s depiction of life in the New World to develop an understanding that we hope to present at the Student Research Symposium.