Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Determining Redshift via Astronomical Spectroscopy

Class

Article

College

College of Science

Faculty Mentor

Jonathan Price

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

The Doppler effect is a well-known physical phenomenon which results in a change of a wave’s frequency or wavelength due to the motion of its source. Celestial objects in space (stars, galaxies, etc.) also experience a Doppler effect on their emitted electromagnetic radiation called redshift. In this study, redshifts were observed in the spectrographic observations of various celestial objects. This was done using a high-resolution near ultra-violet spectrometer in conjunction with the USU observatory’s 0.5m telescope. The spectrometer was used to measure the absorption spectrum of the bodies and then these absorption spectrums were compared against the Hydrogen emission spectrum. By calculating the difference in wavelength between the body’s absorption spectrum and Hydrogen’s emission spectrum, a redshift value, z, was determined. The redshift values for these celestial bodies were then used to infer additional information about them, such as velocity and distance.

Location

The South Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 11:45 AM

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Apr 12th, 10:30 AM Apr 12th, 11:45 AM

Determining Redshift via Astronomical Spectroscopy

The South Atrium

The Doppler effect is a well-known physical phenomenon which results in a change of a wave’s frequency or wavelength due to the motion of its source. Celestial objects in space (stars, galaxies, etc.) also experience a Doppler effect on their emitted electromagnetic radiation called redshift. In this study, redshifts were observed in the spectrographic observations of various celestial objects. This was done using a high-resolution near ultra-violet spectrometer in conjunction with the USU observatory’s 0.5m telescope. The spectrometer was used to measure the absorption spectrum of the bodies and then these absorption spectrums were compared against the Hydrogen emission spectrum. By calculating the difference in wavelength between the body’s absorption spectrum and Hydrogen’s emission spectrum, a redshift value, z, was determined. The redshift values for these celestial bodies were then used to infer additional information about them, such as velocity and distance.