Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Selecting and Grafting Single-leaf Pinyon Pine (Pinus monophylla) for Pine Nut Production

Class

Article

College

College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences

Faculty Mentor

Larry Rupp

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Pine nuts are in high demand across the world. Single-leaf pinyon pine (Pinus monophylla) are native to the Great Basin and produce high quality pine nuts. This species has never been selected or bred for higher productivity due to the long time before the tree reaches a mature state. Our hypothesis is that using a method of counting the scars left by cones on the branches, trees with superior cone production can be identified. Grafting scions from these superior trees onto poorer producing pinyons could increase profits on private, marginal lands. Stands of good yielding pinyons have been located in the Toiyabe, Raft River, Tintic, and Hamlin ranges of Utah and Nevada. Scions were collected from three superior producing trees at each location and then grafted onto Pinus edulis seedlings using a side wedge or side veneer graft. Results from the grafting experiment are pending.

Location

The North Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 11:45 AM

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Apr 12th, 10:30 AM Apr 12th, 11:45 AM

Selecting and Grafting Single-leaf Pinyon Pine (Pinus monophylla) for Pine Nut Production

The North Atrium

Pine nuts are in high demand across the world. Single-leaf pinyon pine (Pinus monophylla) are native to the Great Basin and produce high quality pine nuts. This species has never been selected or bred for higher productivity due to the long time before the tree reaches a mature state. Our hypothesis is that using a method of counting the scars left by cones on the branches, trees with superior cone production can be identified. Grafting scions from these superior trees onto poorer producing pinyons could increase profits on private, marginal lands. Stands of good yielding pinyons have been located in the Toiyabe, Raft River, Tintic, and Hamlin ranges of Utah and Nevada. Scions were collected from three superior producing trees at each location and then grafted onto Pinus edulis seedlings using a side wedge or side veneer graft. Results from the grafting experiment are pending.