Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

The Importance of Logo Symmetry in Fashion Branding: Theoretical Foundation and Content Analysis

Class

Article

College

Jon M. Huntsman School of Business

Faculty Mentor

Kenneth Bartkus

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Logos are one of the graphic design elements of a brand and serve numerous important functions. Shimp (2007), for example, notes that logos represent a ‘shorthand way of identifying a brand.” (p. 195). Watkins & Gonzenbach (2013) suggest that logos serve to communicate brand’s personality to the target audience. Hynes (2009) reminds us that logos can act as a mark of quality and a way to increase a company’s reputation. Finally, logos help differentiate the brand from competing alternatives (Janiszewski and Meyvis, 2001; MacInnis, Shapiro, and Manu, 1999; Park, Eisingerich, and Park, 2013). Logos, therefore, need to be carefully designed to ensure that they effectively communicate the correct meaning of the brand. In this study, we extend this research and examine the concept of logo symmetry as it relates to brands that promote beauty/attractiveness as a core brand promise. The theoretical foundation for the study is the overwhelming evidence from the scholarly literature that symmetrical designs are closely associated with perceptions of attractiveness and beauty (Enquist and Arak, 1994; Rhodes, Proffitt, Grady, & Sumich, 1998; Rhodes, Sumich, & Byatt, 1999; Berri, Simmons, Van Gilder, & O'Neill, 2011). This implies that symmetrical logo designs would be relevant to brands that promote beauty and attractiveness. The question is: do these logo designs reflect the established evidence? To help answer this question, we conduct a content analysis of brand logos from the cosmetic and fashion industry (i.e., sectors where beauty and attractiveness represent a core brand promise) and compare the results with those from an analysis of logos used by charitable organizations (i.e., a sector that does not typically promote beauty and attractiveness as a brand promise). The results are intended to test the degree to which brands have adopt established evidence from the scientific literature and incorporated it into their logo strategy.

Location

The North Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 10:15 AM

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:15 AM

The Importance of Logo Symmetry in Fashion Branding: Theoretical Foundation and Content Analysis

The North Atrium

Logos are one of the graphic design elements of a brand and serve numerous important functions. Shimp (2007), for example, notes that logos represent a ‘shorthand way of identifying a brand.” (p. 195). Watkins & Gonzenbach (2013) suggest that logos serve to communicate brand’s personality to the target audience. Hynes (2009) reminds us that logos can act as a mark of quality and a way to increase a company’s reputation. Finally, logos help differentiate the brand from competing alternatives (Janiszewski and Meyvis, 2001; MacInnis, Shapiro, and Manu, 1999; Park, Eisingerich, and Park, 2013). Logos, therefore, need to be carefully designed to ensure that they effectively communicate the correct meaning of the brand. In this study, we extend this research and examine the concept of logo symmetry as it relates to brands that promote beauty/attractiveness as a core brand promise. The theoretical foundation for the study is the overwhelming evidence from the scholarly literature that symmetrical designs are closely associated with perceptions of attractiveness and beauty (Enquist and Arak, 1994; Rhodes, Proffitt, Grady, & Sumich, 1998; Rhodes, Sumich, & Byatt, 1999; Berri, Simmons, Van Gilder, & O'Neill, 2011). This implies that symmetrical logo designs would be relevant to brands that promote beauty and attractiveness. The question is: do these logo designs reflect the established evidence? To help answer this question, we conduct a content analysis of brand logos from the cosmetic and fashion industry (i.e., sectors where beauty and attractiveness represent a core brand promise) and compare the results with those from an analysis of logos used by charitable organizations (i.e., a sector that does not typically promote beauty and attractiveness as a brand promise). The results are intended to test the degree to which brands have adopt established evidence from the scientific literature and incorporated it into their logo strategy.