Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

From Foxhole to Family-room; exploring the unique needs and challenges faced by American Military and Veteran Families

Class

Article

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Mentor

Mehmet Soyer

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Most people would agree that we should take care of our service members as they return from military service, but little thought goes into exactly what that looks like, or how it might differ from one veteran to the next. This project will be an exploration of differences in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as it relates to combat, and to sexual traumas experienced in the military. Whether each are unique in their symptom sets, and as importantly how they are most effectively treated. All too often Post Traumatic Stress is used as a blanket term and is similarly offered blanket treatment options which could be arguably much more successful if fine-tuned at least into categories distinct enough to apply effective evidence based treatments to each major group. This study will review available literature as it relates to the following mental health challenges individually, and related literature on the most effective treatments for each. First, and the most commonly associated with military personnel shall be Combat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C PTSD). The disorder will be studied, as well as the most clinically and cost effective treatments best suited to treatment of it. Military Sexual Trauma (MST) is known to cause PTSD at higher rates than Combat exposure, and has been reported by nearly a quarter of females utilizing the Veterans Affairs healthcare system will be explored next, again exploring the most clinically and cost effective treatments and interventions will be examined. Last, a thorough comparison will be completed to identify possible differences in symptoms experienced by both populations, as well as potential differences in the most effective treatments for each type of PTSD in a clinical setting the results of which may be compared with current treatments used most frequently today by the department of Veterans Affairs.

Location

Room 154

Start Date

4-12-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 1:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 12:00 PM Apr 12th, 1:15 PM

From Foxhole to Family-room; exploring the unique needs and challenges faced by American Military and Veteran Families

Room 154

Most people would agree that we should take care of our service members as they return from military service, but little thought goes into exactly what that looks like, or how it might differ from one veteran to the next. This project will be an exploration of differences in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as it relates to combat, and to sexual traumas experienced in the military. Whether each are unique in their symptom sets, and as importantly how they are most effectively treated. All too often Post Traumatic Stress is used as a blanket term and is similarly offered blanket treatment options which could be arguably much more successful if fine-tuned at least into categories distinct enough to apply effective evidence based treatments to each major group. This study will review available literature as it relates to the following mental health challenges individually, and related literature on the most effective treatments for each. First, and the most commonly associated with military personnel shall be Combat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C PTSD). The disorder will be studied, as well as the most clinically and cost effective treatments best suited to treatment of it. Military Sexual Trauma (MST) is known to cause PTSD at higher rates than Combat exposure, and has been reported by nearly a quarter of females utilizing the Veterans Affairs healthcare system will be explored next, again exploring the most clinically and cost effective treatments and interventions will be examined. Last, a thorough comparison will be completed to identify possible differences in symptoms experienced by both populations, as well as potential differences in the most effective treatments for each type of PTSD in a clinical setting the results of which may be compared with current treatments used most frequently today by the department of Veterans Affairs.