Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

3D Previsualization

Class

Article

College

Caine College of the Arts

Faculty Mentor

Mike Daines

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Many advertisements we see everyday are not actually photographs of those products, they are 3D renderings. If you’ve ever seen an Apple commercial and wondered how closeups of a flawless product moving across a pure white background were produced, it is not video of an unscratched product rigged with fishing line, it’s all 3D. Many companies want their products to look pristine, devoid of dust particles, imperfections, scratches, sprues, and flash; and some other companies want all the imperfections photography would produce, but in a way that is more cost effective, consistent, and more flexible to use than photography. 3D previsualization is a process in which a product is created in 3D software, made to look as realistic, or as unrealistic as is desired. Once the product is built and textured, it can be rendered into images, animated in videos, used to create molds to make the product, and 3D printed to be handled, used, or to assist in building other products. This means companies can visualize the product and work out any issues before making it, begin marketing and selling a product before paying to have it manufactured, and make companion products that will fit it perfectly (think phone cases being made for an iPhone that does not yet exist). Most importantly are the infinite possibilities of 3D; the product never has to be cleaned, staged, or photographed, it can be animated and rendered from any angle, and can be used to show things that are not possible to capture in real life. The object is created once, and most of the work is done. It can be repurposed multiple times to show 360 rotating displays, exploded views, glamour shots, etc. It could be something as straightforward as viewing an engine from inside, or something as fantastic as a bubble materializing into a Nike running shoe, showing that the product is light as air.

Location

Room 154

Start Date

4-12-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 4:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

3D Previsualization

Room 154

Many advertisements we see everyday are not actually photographs of those products, they are 3D renderings. If you’ve ever seen an Apple commercial and wondered how closeups of a flawless product moving across a pure white background were produced, it is not video of an unscratched product rigged with fishing line, it’s all 3D. Many companies want their products to look pristine, devoid of dust particles, imperfections, scratches, sprues, and flash; and some other companies want all the imperfections photography would produce, but in a way that is more cost effective, consistent, and more flexible to use than photography. 3D previsualization is a process in which a product is created in 3D software, made to look as realistic, or as unrealistic as is desired. Once the product is built and textured, it can be rendered into images, animated in videos, used to create molds to make the product, and 3D printed to be handled, used, or to assist in building other products. This means companies can visualize the product and work out any issues before making it, begin marketing and selling a product before paying to have it manufactured, and make companion products that will fit it perfectly (think phone cases being made for an iPhone that does not yet exist). Most importantly are the infinite possibilities of 3D; the product never has to be cleaned, staged, or photographed, it can be animated and rendered from any angle, and can be used to show things that are not possible to capture in real life. The object is created once, and most of the work is done. It can be repurposed multiple times to show 360 rotating displays, exploded views, glamour shots, etc. It could be something as straightforward as viewing an engine from inside, or something as fantastic as a bubble materializing into a Nike running shoe, showing that the product is light as air.