Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Pamphlets for War: The Role of Lord Burghley’s Pamphlet Discourse in Avoiding Civil War

Class

Article

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Mentor

Susan Cogan

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

During the sixteenth century, England sat as a conflicted nation among a continent of tumultuous civil wars and reformations. While neighboring countries fought within and among themselves, England somehow managed to avoid a formal civil war. The confounding lack of war in England during the latter half of the sixteenth century could be related to the constant discourse between prominent protestants and catholics. One such prominent protestant was Lord Cecil Burghley, who served as a royal minister and maintained good relations with Queen Elizabeth I. Lord Burghley’s pamphlet, The Execution of Justice in England, and other documents of discourse at the time may contribute to a war of pamphlets based on the rhetoric and relationship Burghley demonstrated. With our research, we hope to discover what within the pamphlets contributed to keeping the religious turbulence within the realms of a war of discourse rather than a full-fledged civil war. Based on preliminary investigation, we have found that the rhetoric of the pamphlets, the sheer amount of discourse and correspondence, and the relationship between the writers and the audiences could have contributed to England’s abstinence from civil war. Observing the discourse within Burghley’s pamphlet and other responding documents, we can gain an understanding of what set England apart from other surrounding countries facing similar religious and political tumult. Our findings may also contribute to a greater conversation surrounding the power of conversation, dialogue, and discourse to either prevent or incite war.

Location

The South Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 10:15 AM

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:15 AM

Pamphlets for War: The Role of Lord Burghley’s Pamphlet Discourse in Avoiding Civil War

The South Atrium

During the sixteenth century, England sat as a conflicted nation among a continent of tumultuous civil wars and reformations. While neighboring countries fought within and among themselves, England somehow managed to avoid a formal civil war. The confounding lack of war in England during the latter half of the sixteenth century could be related to the constant discourse between prominent protestants and catholics. One such prominent protestant was Lord Cecil Burghley, who served as a royal minister and maintained good relations with Queen Elizabeth I. Lord Burghley’s pamphlet, The Execution of Justice in England, and other documents of discourse at the time may contribute to a war of pamphlets based on the rhetoric and relationship Burghley demonstrated. With our research, we hope to discover what within the pamphlets contributed to keeping the religious turbulence within the realms of a war of discourse rather than a full-fledged civil war. Based on preliminary investigation, we have found that the rhetoric of the pamphlets, the sheer amount of discourse and correspondence, and the relationship between the writers and the audiences could have contributed to England’s abstinence from civil war. Observing the discourse within Burghley’s pamphlet and other responding documents, we can gain an understanding of what set England apart from other surrounding countries facing similar religious and political tumult. Our findings may also contribute to a greater conversation surrounding the power of conversation, dialogue, and discourse to either prevent or incite war.