Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Empowerment through religious practice: a study of the medieval female pilgrim.

Class

Article

College

Caine College of the Arts

Faculty Mentor

Alexa Sand

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

In a world run by men and religion, medieval women still found ways to proclaim their religious devotion. Though embarking on pilgrimage provided many specific (and sometimes dangerous) challenges for women, many still found ways to pay homage to the sacred, both at home and abroad. A closer look at the prayer books of German nuns, decorated with woodcut printed images and hand sewn elements will give insight to the aspect of imagined pilgrimage, a method available to women unable to partake in the physical journey due to their enclosed monastic lifestyle. Furthermore, an investigation of “Blood and Body” practices paired with the gruesome renditions of the crucifixion depicted by nuns in prayer books will show how women sought to experience the life and suffering of Christ, even when unable to walk where he walked. In contrast, Examining the life story of Margery Kempe, through the original copy of her autobiography will give understanding on what life was like for a journeying female pilgrim. This study will explore the roles women played in religion, both through struggle and empowerment, as they sought their own pilgrimage experiences.

Location

Room 101

Start Date

4-12-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 11:45 AM

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Apr 12th, 10:30 AM Apr 12th, 11:45 AM

Empowerment through religious practice: a study of the medieval female pilgrim.

Room 101

In a world run by men and religion, medieval women still found ways to proclaim their religious devotion. Though embarking on pilgrimage provided many specific (and sometimes dangerous) challenges for women, many still found ways to pay homage to the sacred, both at home and abroad. A closer look at the prayer books of German nuns, decorated with woodcut printed images and hand sewn elements will give insight to the aspect of imagined pilgrimage, a method available to women unable to partake in the physical journey due to their enclosed monastic lifestyle. Furthermore, an investigation of “Blood and Body” practices paired with the gruesome renditions of the crucifixion depicted by nuns in prayer books will show how women sought to experience the life and suffering of Christ, even when unable to walk where he walked. In contrast, Examining the life story of Margery Kempe, through the original copy of her autobiography will give understanding on what life was like for a journeying female pilgrim. This study will explore the roles women played in religion, both through struggle and empowerment, as they sought their own pilgrimage experiences.