Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Exploring Relationships between Students’ Discussion Patterns, Emotions and Learning Outcomes in an Online Mathematics Course

Class

Article

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Faculty Mentor

Mimi Recker

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

This study aims to 1) identify and characterize groups of students based on their online discussion patterns, emotions, and contents; and 2) investigate associations between these patterns and their learning outcomes in an online developmental mathematics course. Data mining of both clickstream and textual data collected by a Learning Management System (LMS) enabled an analysis in terms of how students meaningfully engaged with discussions, conceived as both online speaking and listening behaviors. Findings revealed six groups of students that exhibited similar online discussion patterns and emotions. Moreover, higher performing students showed higher levels online listening and were more engaged in course content; lower performing students showed superficial engagement in the discussions as they talked about off-topic content.

Location

Room 154

Start Date

4-12-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 11:45 AM

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Apr 12th, 10:30 AM Apr 12th, 11:45 AM

Exploring Relationships between Students’ Discussion Patterns, Emotions and Learning Outcomes in an Online Mathematics Course

Room 154

This study aims to 1) identify and characterize groups of students based on their online discussion patterns, emotions, and contents; and 2) investigate associations between these patterns and their learning outcomes in an online developmental mathematics course. Data mining of both clickstream and textual data collected by a Learning Management System (LMS) enabled an analysis in terms of how students meaningfully engaged with discussions, conceived as both online speaking and listening behaviors. Findings revealed six groups of students that exhibited similar online discussion patterns and emotions. Moreover, higher performing students showed higher levels online listening and were more engaged in course content; lower performing students showed superficial engagement in the discussions as they talked about off-topic content.