Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Give us a HAND: Holistic narrative quality rating of stories told by typically developing children

Class

Article

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Faculty Mentor

Sandi Gillam

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Children who have language disorders demonstrate difficulty producing complete and coherent presentation narratives. Even when children include all story grammar elements, these elements may not be well organized or elaborated sufficiently. Organization and elements of artful storytelling such as elaborated noun phrases and vibrant vocabulary (Ukrainetz & Gillam, 2009) may not be adequately captured in narrative assessments such as the Test of Narrative Language, 2nd Edition (Gillam & Pearson, 2017). Holistic ratings of narrative quality may provide a way to capture qualitative elements of stories that other assessment fail to detect. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a measure of holistic quality of narrative abilities aligned with scores obtained on a standardized measure of narrative proficiency in typically developing children. Scores on the Holistic Assessment of Narrative Discourse (HAND; Holbrook, Beck, Reische, Froerer, Mumford, & Gillam, in preparation 2017) rubric were compared to scores on the Test of Narrative Language- Second Edition (TNL- 2; Gillam & Pearson, 2017). The HAND was modified from the holistic scoring system reported by McFadden and Gillam (1996) and was designed to be used in conjunction with the TNL2. Stories from 260 typically developing 4-7 year-old children collected during the norming process of the TNL2 were transcribed using Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (Miller & Igelsias, 2012) and then rated by trained scorers using the HAND. Scores were then correlated with the total raw scores of the TNL2 to determine the degree to which they related to one another. The HAND may provide additional information for clinicians to use in intervention planning. The results of this study may help us to inform our assessment of children with language impairments by understanding how methods for quantifying narrative proficiency differ qualitatively and quantitatively.

Location

The South Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 4:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Give us a HAND: Holistic narrative quality rating of stories told by typically developing children

The South Atrium

Children who have language disorders demonstrate difficulty producing complete and coherent presentation narratives. Even when children include all story grammar elements, these elements may not be well organized or elaborated sufficiently. Organization and elements of artful storytelling such as elaborated noun phrases and vibrant vocabulary (Ukrainetz & Gillam, 2009) may not be adequately captured in narrative assessments such as the Test of Narrative Language, 2nd Edition (Gillam & Pearson, 2017). Holistic ratings of narrative quality may provide a way to capture qualitative elements of stories that other assessment fail to detect. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a measure of holistic quality of narrative abilities aligned with scores obtained on a standardized measure of narrative proficiency in typically developing children. Scores on the Holistic Assessment of Narrative Discourse (HAND; Holbrook, Beck, Reische, Froerer, Mumford, & Gillam, in preparation 2017) rubric were compared to scores on the Test of Narrative Language- Second Edition (TNL- 2; Gillam & Pearson, 2017). The HAND was modified from the holistic scoring system reported by McFadden and Gillam (1996) and was designed to be used in conjunction with the TNL2. Stories from 260 typically developing 4-7 year-old children collected during the norming process of the TNL2 were transcribed using Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (Miller & Igelsias, 2012) and then rated by trained scorers using the HAND. Scores were then correlated with the total raw scores of the TNL2 to determine the degree to which they related to one another. The HAND may provide additional information for clinicians to use in intervention planning. The results of this study may help us to inform our assessment of children with language impairments by understanding how methods for quantifying narrative proficiency differ qualitatively and quantitatively.