Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

A Qualitative Investigation of How Student Parents Cope with Multiple Roles

Class

Article

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Faculty Mentor

Lisa Boyce

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Postsecondary education is associated with higher incomes, positive mental health, positive parenting practices, low levels of parenting stress, children's academic success, and children's social competence. The purpose of the study was to investigate the stressors college student-parents experience and the coping strategies they use to manage their multiple roles (i.e., parent and student). Interviews also aimed to understand how parents avoided having their stress negatively spillover into the parent-child relationship. Semi-structured qualitative interviews (N = 14) were conducted with college student parents who had a child aged 36 months or younger. Results revealed four categories of themes that lent insight into student-parent experiences: responses to being a student-parent, causes of stress, coping strategies, and motivation. Implications are discussed.

Location

The North Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 10:15 AM

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:15 AM

A Qualitative Investigation of How Student Parents Cope with Multiple Roles

The North Atrium

Postsecondary education is associated with higher incomes, positive mental health, positive parenting practices, low levels of parenting stress, children's academic success, and children's social competence. The purpose of the study was to investigate the stressors college student-parents experience and the coping strategies they use to manage their multiple roles (i.e., parent and student). Interviews also aimed to understand how parents avoided having their stress negatively spillover into the parent-child relationship. Semi-structured qualitative interviews (N = 14) were conducted with college student parents who had a child aged 36 months or younger. Results revealed four categories of themes that lent insight into student-parent experiences: responses to being a student-parent, causes of stress, coping strategies, and motivation. Implications are discussed.