Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

The Effects of a Procedure to Generalize Asking "Where?" in Children with Autism

Class

Article

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Faculty Mentor

Tom Higbee

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Asking for answers to questions is a skill often taught to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) by creating motivation such that the answer becomes especially relevant for the child (Lechago & Low, 2015). While this skill has been taught in specific situations, it does not always generalize, or transfer, to other appropriate situations . One way of creating motivation to teach asking is using interrupted-behavior chains, in which one object to complete a preferred task is missing (e.g., presenting milk, chocolate syrup, and a spoon to make chocolate milk, but no cup). We used multiple interrupted-behavior chains, with different objects missing from each chain, to teach asking where the missing items were located to three preschoolers with ASD. We then tested for generalization to novel objects in novel chains, as well as novel objects in novel play situations. All participants learned to ask "where" during training. However, we only observed partial generalization, which was context-specific for each participant. Direct training for the contexts in which asking "where" did not generalize lead to quick acquisition of the skill. Potential reasons for of context-specific responding and their relevance to clinical practice are discussed.

Location

Room 154

Start Date

4-12-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 1:15 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 12:00 PM Apr 12th, 1:15 PM

The Effects of a Procedure to Generalize Asking "Where?" in Children with Autism

Room 154

Asking for answers to questions is a skill often taught to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) by creating motivation such that the answer becomes especially relevant for the child (Lechago & Low, 2015). While this skill has been taught in specific situations, it does not always generalize, or transfer, to other appropriate situations . One way of creating motivation to teach asking is using interrupted-behavior chains, in which one object to complete a preferred task is missing (e.g., presenting milk, chocolate syrup, and a spoon to make chocolate milk, but no cup). We used multiple interrupted-behavior chains, with different objects missing from each chain, to teach asking where the missing items were located to three preschoolers with ASD. We then tested for generalization to novel objects in novel chains, as well as novel objects in novel play situations. All participants learned to ask "where" during training. However, we only observed partial generalization, which was context-specific for each participant. Direct training for the contexts in which asking "where" did not generalize lead to quick acquisition of the skill. Potential reasons for of context-specific responding and their relevance to clinical practice are discussed.