Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Is information provided by Crisis Named Resources on Facebook and Twitter trustworthy?

Class

Article

College

College of Engineering

Faculty Mentor

Amanda Hughes

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Crisis Named Resources (CNRs) are social media pages and accounts named after a crisis event. CNRs appear to be dedicated and authoritative online sources that facilitate crisis-related information exchange around a crisis event. They are easy to find when looking for crisis-related information on social media, and as a result, they tend to receive more attention than other sources of information. This study examines the factors considered by members of the public and experts when evaluating the trustworthiness of CNRs. In this study, members of the public and experts are shown screenshots of Hurricane Irma Facebook and Twitter CNRs, and are asked why they trust (or not trust) these resources. The assessment of trustworthiness from the research participants is collected through surveys, and in-person and remote interviews. The survey and interview questions address four components of trust, namely ability (group of skills, competencies, and characteristics that make a party influential in a specific domain), benevolence (extent to which a trustee is believed to work in the trustor’s interests), integrity (extent to which a trustee adheres to the principles acceptable by the trustor), and reliability (extent to which trustor feels secure and comfortable about relying on the information provided by trustee). Results from the surveys and interviews will be deductively and thematically organized to understand the factors that contribute to the trustworthiness of these resources. This exercise will also be useful to see how the opinions on trustworthiness of the public and experts compare. Preliminary results of this study will be reported in the talk.

Location

Room 204

Start Date

4-12-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 1:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 12:00 PM Apr 12th, 1:15 PM

Is information provided by Crisis Named Resources on Facebook and Twitter trustworthy?

Room 204

Crisis Named Resources (CNRs) are social media pages and accounts named after a crisis event. CNRs appear to be dedicated and authoritative online sources that facilitate crisis-related information exchange around a crisis event. They are easy to find when looking for crisis-related information on social media, and as a result, they tend to receive more attention than other sources of information. This study examines the factors considered by members of the public and experts when evaluating the trustworthiness of CNRs. In this study, members of the public and experts are shown screenshots of Hurricane Irma Facebook and Twitter CNRs, and are asked why they trust (or not trust) these resources. The assessment of trustworthiness from the research participants is collected through surveys, and in-person and remote interviews. The survey and interview questions address four components of trust, namely ability (group of skills, competencies, and characteristics that make a party influential in a specific domain), benevolence (extent to which a trustee is believed to work in the trustor’s interests), integrity (extent to which a trustee adheres to the principles acceptable by the trustor), and reliability (extent to which trustor feels secure and comfortable about relying on the information provided by trustee). Results from the surveys and interviews will be deductively and thematically organized to understand the factors that contribute to the trustworthiness of these resources. This exercise will also be useful to see how the opinions on trustworthiness of the public and experts compare. Preliminary results of this study will be reported in the talk.