Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Chilly Climate? Findings from the 2016 STEM Graduate Student Survey at USU

Class

Article

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Mentor

Christy Glass

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Using data from a 2016 STEM Graduate Student Climate Survey from Utah State University (USU), we investigate the cultural climate for women, racial/ethnic minority, LGBTQ, and non-LDS graduate students in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) at USU. Our findings reveal that these students are more likely to experience bias, harassment, or discrimination at USU than other students. Prior research in this area has largely focused on institutional barriers impeding faculty from underrepresented groups from reaching tenured and leadership positions in STEM. This study fills a gap in current knowledge by examining the effect that this lack of representation may have on underrepresented graduate students in STEM. Our findings reveal a need for greater research into the climate for graduate students in STEM at USU and the factors that influence a more balanced climate for all students regardless of status, identity, or group membership.

Location

Room 204

Start Date

4-12-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 2:45 PM

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Apr 12th, 1:30 PM Apr 12th, 2:45 PM

Chilly Climate? Findings from the 2016 STEM Graduate Student Survey at USU

Room 204

Using data from a 2016 STEM Graduate Student Climate Survey from Utah State University (USU), we investigate the cultural climate for women, racial/ethnic minority, LGBTQ, and non-LDS graduate students in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) at USU. Our findings reveal that these students are more likely to experience bias, harassment, or discrimination at USU than other students. Prior research in this area has largely focused on institutional barriers impeding faculty from underrepresented groups from reaching tenured and leadership positions in STEM. This study fills a gap in current knowledge by examining the effect that this lack of representation may have on underrepresented graduate students in STEM. Our findings reveal a need for greater research into the climate for graduate students in STEM at USU and the factors that influence a more balanced climate for all students regardless of status, identity, or group membership.