Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Occasional Liturgy in the Henrician Reformation

Class

Article

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Mentor

Norm Jones

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

The story of the English Reformation is a story of politics and religion. England's schism from Roman Catholicism, altering the course of centuries of history hence, hinges upon moments within one monarch's reign: King Henry VIII (1487-1547). The Henrician Reformation, a subset of the English Reformation, began the trend of religious changes imposed from the top upon the English population. Understand how the country came to (in general) adapt to these changes requires studying the royal family. Henry VIII was the new Supreme Head of the English Church, and important, highly-visible ceremonies—especially christenings, marriages, and funerals—provided an avenue to incorporate new orthodoxy, or to keep old traditions, depending upon pressures from without. These liturgical moments are thus sites of conflict between traditional Catholic doctrine and the new orthodoxy. This paper surveys the liturgical moments surrounding royal births, marriages, and deaths to show on a microcosmic scale the conflict and the evolution of the Henrician Reformation.

Location

Room 421

Start Date

4-12-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 4:15 PM

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Occasional Liturgy in the Henrician Reformation

Room 421

The story of the English Reformation is a story of politics and religion. England's schism from Roman Catholicism, altering the course of centuries of history hence, hinges upon moments within one monarch's reign: King Henry VIII (1487-1547). The Henrician Reformation, a subset of the English Reformation, began the trend of religious changes imposed from the top upon the English population. Understand how the country came to (in general) adapt to these changes requires studying the royal family. Henry VIII was the new Supreme Head of the English Church, and important, highly-visible ceremonies—especially christenings, marriages, and funerals—provided an avenue to incorporate new orthodoxy, or to keep old traditions, depending upon pressures from without. These liturgical moments are thus sites of conflict between traditional Catholic doctrine and the new orthodoxy. This paper surveys the liturgical moments surrounding royal births, marriages, and deaths to show on a microcosmic scale the conflict and the evolution of the Henrician Reformation.