Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Women's Rights as a Key to Climate Change Mitigation

Class

Article

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Mentor

Jennifer Givens

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Gender-related studies of climate change have revealed a higher vulnerability of women to climate-related environmental risks. Current research suggests in the developing world where impacts of climate change will be most felt, women specifically will be most negatively impacted due to gendered divisions of labor and reliance on natural resources. While the impacts of climate change will eventually influence all people, the impacts will fall unequally along the lines of gender, class, and race. This study aims to explore whether or not the global advancement of women’s rights is a critical factor in mitigating the detrimental impacts of climate change. Using data measuring nation-state level of commitment to international treaties regarding both women and the environment, we further our understanding of the relationship between gender and macro-level decision making regarding climate change. Environmental policies and protocols that fail to directly involve and address global inequalities of gender may further marginalize women across the globe.

Location

The South Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 4:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Women's Rights as a Key to Climate Change Mitigation

The South Atrium

Gender-related studies of climate change have revealed a higher vulnerability of women to climate-related environmental risks. Current research suggests in the developing world where impacts of climate change will be most felt, women specifically will be most negatively impacted due to gendered divisions of labor and reliance on natural resources. While the impacts of climate change will eventually influence all people, the impacts will fall unequally along the lines of gender, class, and race. This study aims to explore whether or not the global advancement of women’s rights is a critical factor in mitigating the detrimental impacts of climate change. Using data measuring nation-state level of commitment to international treaties regarding both women and the environment, we further our understanding of the relationship between gender and macro-level decision making regarding climate change. Environmental policies and protocols that fail to directly involve and address global inequalities of gender may further marginalize women across the globe.