Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Radiometric analysis of infrared camera images using gas cell spectroscopy

Class

Article

College

College of Science

Faculty Mentor

Jim Dyer

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment is to create an environment in which a FLIR A6604 infrared camera can be calibrated to detect methane gas leaks on the order of approximately 0.1 g/hr. Controlled environment parameters include plume temperature, background temperature, and plume flow rate. The infrared camera is pointed at a temperature controlled uniform black background, the temperature of which is controlled using a water bath. In the center of the camera’s field of view (FOV) is a gas plume nozzle which is also regulated using a water bath and the plume flow rate is regulated using rotameters that were calibrated on-site using a bubble flow meter. Gas sampling bulbs are then used to sample the plume in various locations in the camera’s FOV. These samples are used to determine the concentration of methane gas in the plume using gas cell spectroscopy. From these samples a concentration gradient of methane can be assessed. The data obtained using the gas cell spectroscopy method will be correlated with the images from the infrared camera. A radiometric model is then created using these data.

Location

The North Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 4:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Radiometric analysis of infrared camera images using gas cell spectroscopy

The North Atrium

The purpose of this experiment is to create an environment in which a FLIR A6604 infrared camera can be calibrated to detect methane gas leaks on the order of approximately 0.1 g/hr. Controlled environment parameters include plume temperature, background temperature, and plume flow rate. The infrared camera is pointed at a temperature controlled uniform black background, the temperature of which is controlled using a water bath. In the center of the camera’s field of view (FOV) is a gas plume nozzle which is also regulated using a water bath and the plume flow rate is regulated using rotameters that were calibrated on-site using a bubble flow meter. Gas sampling bulbs are then used to sample the plume in various locations in the camera’s FOV. These samples are used to determine the concentration of methane gas in the plume using gas cell spectroscopy. From these samples a concentration gradient of methane can be assessed. The data obtained using the gas cell spectroscopy method will be correlated with the images from the infrared camera. A radiometric model is then created using these data.