Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Euskadi: St. Ignatius of Loyola (The Basque)

Class

Article

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department

History Department

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

St. Ignatius of Loyola is most recognized as the founder of the Society of Jesus, commonly known as the Jesuit order, whose members often led the charge of the Catholic Counter-Reformation. During a long convalescence from an injury in battle, he experienced a spiritual awakening and dedicated his life to living as the Saints had lived. Ignatius was canonized less than a century after his death and has been venerated as a Saint ever since. In fact, he is the patron saint of the Basque people, who call themselves the Euskadi. The events of his later life, especially the spiritual events, are well known because they were recorded by his followers, but much of his early life is still unknown. For example, many people outside of the Euskadi do not recognize Ignatius as Basque. Scholars from any of the five centuries that have passed since his death have briefly glossed over his Basque birthplace before moving on to seemingly more important questions. And yet, the Euskadi claim him fiercely and exclusively as their own. This paper, based on research conducted for my senior capstone project, will explore the effects of Basque heritage in Ignatius' life and its impact on his work in founding the Society of Jesus. The argument will be divided into three parts - first, proof that Ignatius knew and understood his Basque heritage. Second, that he continued to be affected by it throughout his life, and third, that there are certain aspects of his work that were also influenced by his heritage.

Location

Room 101

Start Date

4-11-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

4-11-2019 2:45 PM

Share

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Apr 11th, 1:30 PM Apr 11th, 2:45 PM

Euskadi: St. Ignatius of Loyola (The Basque)

Room 101

St. Ignatius of Loyola is most recognized as the founder of the Society of Jesus, commonly known as the Jesuit order, whose members often led the charge of the Catholic Counter-Reformation. During a long convalescence from an injury in battle, he experienced a spiritual awakening and dedicated his life to living as the Saints had lived. Ignatius was canonized less than a century after his death and has been venerated as a Saint ever since. In fact, he is the patron saint of the Basque people, who call themselves the Euskadi. The events of his later life, especially the spiritual events, are well known because they were recorded by his followers, but much of his early life is still unknown. For example, many people outside of the Euskadi do not recognize Ignatius as Basque. Scholars from any of the five centuries that have passed since his death have briefly glossed over his Basque birthplace before moving on to seemingly more important questions. And yet, the Euskadi claim him fiercely and exclusively as their own. This paper, based on research conducted for my senior capstone project, will explore the effects of Basque heritage in Ignatius' life and its impact on his work in founding the Society of Jesus. The argument will be divided into three parts - first, proof that Ignatius knew and understood his Basque heritage. Second, that he continued to be affected by it throughout his life, and third, that there are certain aspects of his work that were also influenced by his heritage.