Event Title

Beyond Collaborative Decision-Making: Practices for “Matching” Ecological and Social Systems in Forest Restoration

Presenter Information

Jesse Abrams

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

https://www.restoringthewest.org/

Streaming Media

Abstract

The forest decision-making paradigm in the West has shifted over time, with collaborative models having become institutionalized in the contemporary era. However, other elements beyond collaborative decision-making are needed for successful forest restoration. In this presentation, I will provide insights from restoration endeavors across the West to highlight the issues of local legitimacy and capacity that are often crucial to forest restoration success. Legitimacy is enhanced through the involvement of credible intermediaries, the incorporation of local knowledge, and the authority to adapt broad rules to the local context. Capacity includes not only the physical infrastructure to generate economic benefits from restoration but also the organizational infrastructure needed to navigate complex institutional settings and to fill critical gaps in the public, private, and civil society sectors. The development of these capacities and authorities may be an important strategy for “matching” ecological and social systems in western forests.

Comments

Jesse Abrams is a Research Associate with the Ecosystem Workforce Program, Institute for a Sustainable Environment at the University of Oregon. His research centers on community-based natural resource management, rural development, and environmental policy and governance. He holds a B.A. in Environmental Studies from New College of Florida and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Forest Resources from Oregon State University.

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Oct 17th, 2:00 AM Oct 17th, 2:30 AM

Beyond Collaborative Decision-Making: Practices for “Matching” Ecological and Social Systems in Forest Restoration

USU Eccles Conference Center

The forest decision-making paradigm in the West has shifted over time, with collaborative models having become institutionalized in the contemporary era. However, other elements beyond collaborative decision-making are needed for successful forest restoration. In this presentation, I will provide insights from restoration endeavors across the West to highlight the issues of local legitimacy and capacity that are often crucial to forest restoration success. Legitimacy is enhanced through the involvement of credible intermediaries, the incorporation of local knowledge, and the authority to adapt broad rules to the local context. Capacity includes not only the physical infrastructure to generate economic benefits from restoration but also the organizational infrastructure needed to navigate complex institutional settings and to fill critical gaps in the public, private, and civil society sectors. The development of these capacities and authorities may be an important strategy for “matching” ecological and social systems in western forests.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2017/Oct17/9