Event Title

Perspectives of a Land Manager

Presenter Information

Craig Taggart

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

https://www.restoringthewest.org/

Streaming Media

Abstract

A lightening-caused wildfire in 2002 burned through a third of the 22,000 acre Tercio Ranch in Southern Colorado. Restoration efforts included contour felling, chipping/mulching, and aerial seeding to stabilize the steep ground. Subsequent efforts included forest treatments in strategic locations to reduce the potential for further loss. Significant among these was the work done over succeeding years to protect and regenerate aspen. Work on aspen regeneration has continued on the 172,000 acre Trinchera Ranch, which itself suffered a 14,000 acre wildfire in 2006. That work now includes experimentation on opening exclosures to allow limited ungulate access and a cooperative study with USU to better understand the aspen-elk dynamic. This presentation will address a variety of post-fire restoration techniques, forest treatments, and aspen management practices that have been used on these two ranches over the past 13 years, with observations on both the successes and the “learning opportunities”.

Comments

Craig comes from a diverse educational background (degrees in zoology and landscape architecture) and a broad history of work experience, including three years with the BLM, 25 years consulting as an environmental planner, and the last 14 years in private land management. Craig serves as the Environmental Manager for the 172,000 acre Trinchera Ranch in southern Colorado. This diversity of experience has led to an appreciation of the complex interactions at play in western land management and a creative, solutions-based approach to addressing them. Craig also serves on the board of the Western Landowners Alliance.

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Oct 18th, 1:00 AM Oct 18th, 1:30 AM

Perspectives of a Land Manager

USU Eccles Conference Center

A lightening-caused wildfire in 2002 burned through a third of the 22,000 acre Tercio Ranch in Southern Colorado. Restoration efforts included contour felling, chipping/mulching, and aerial seeding to stabilize the steep ground. Subsequent efforts included forest treatments in strategic locations to reduce the potential for further loss. Significant among these was the work done over succeeding years to protect and regenerate aspen. Work on aspen regeneration has continued on the 172,000 acre Trinchera Ranch, which itself suffered a 14,000 acre wildfire in 2006. That work now includes experimentation on opening exclosures to allow limited ungulate access and a cooperative study with USU to better understand the aspen-elk dynamic. This presentation will address a variety of post-fire restoration techniques, forest treatments, and aspen management practices that have been used on these two ranches over the past 13 years, with observations on both the successes and the “learning opportunities”.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2017/Oct18/5