Event Title

Nutrient Spiraling: A Useful Concept that Provides Important Tools for Aquatic Ecologists and Water Quality Managers

Presenter Information

Michelle Baker

Location

Space Dynamics Laboratory

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-25-2004 3:00 PM

End Date

3-25-2004 3:20 PM

Description

The spiraling concept describes the coupled cycling and longitudinal transport experienced by nutrients in running waters. In its mathematical formulation, nutrient spiraling calculates three metrics of interest to aquatic ecologists and water quality managers. These are: uptake length, the distance a nutrient is transported in the water column prior to immobilization; uptake velocity, the mass transfer coefficient representing nutrient demand; and uptake rate, which is the area-specific rate of immobilization by the stream bed. Each offers insight into the nutrient loss processes that account for nutrient retention by streams. Uptake length in particular, is strongly influenced by stream hydro-geomorphology, especially discharge, depth, and surface water-groundwater exchange. Uptake velocity is highly dependent on nutrient concentration, and uptake rate is often related to benthic biomass. Researchers in my laboratory routinely use these tools to understand nutrient cycling processes in streams, groundwater, and lakes. I will illustrate spiraling with examples from these environments and suggest ways that spiraling may provide useful information for the TMDL process and other aspects of water quality management.

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Mar 25th, 3:00 PM Mar 25th, 3:20 PM

Nutrient Spiraling: A Useful Concept that Provides Important Tools for Aquatic Ecologists and Water Quality Managers

Space Dynamics Laboratory

The spiraling concept describes the coupled cycling and longitudinal transport experienced by nutrients in running waters. In its mathematical formulation, nutrient spiraling calculates three metrics of interest to aquatic ecologists and water quality managers. These are: uptake length, the distance a nutrient is transported in the water column prior to immobilization; uptake velocity, the mass transfer coefficient representing nutrient demand; and uptake rate, which is the area-specific rate of immobilization by the stream bed. Each offers insight into the nutrient loss processes that account for nutrient retention by streams. Uptake length in particular, is strongly influenced by stream hydro-geomorphology, especially discharge, depth, and surface water-groundwater exchange. Uptake velocity is highly dependent on nutrient concentration, and uptake rate is often related to benthic biomass. Researchers in my laboratory routinely use these tools to understand nutrient cycling processes in streams, groundwater, and lakes. I will illustrate spiraling with examples from these environments and suggest ways that spiraling may provide useful information for the TMDL process and other aspects of water quality management.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2004/AllAbstracts/1