Event Title

Conservation Behavior and Native Plant Use in Utah

Location

Space Dynamics Laboratory

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-26-2004 4:00 PM

End Date

3-26-2004 4:15 PM

Description

Native plant use in Utah’s urban and wild land environments increases with drought and conservation awareness. A survey of the Utah Chapter of American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) reveals recent trends in native plant use, landscape professionals' views on the native plant market in Utah, key information needs and sources. Results also discuss some of the dilemmas landscape professionals face when dealing with market pressures which tend to regionalize the sale of native plants and turn ecologically localized natural resources into products. Current labeling and shipping practices leave consumers asking, “How native is native?” The definition of the term “native” according to geographic location makes a difference to landscape professionals when choosing what plants to use to meet various landscape objectives and from where those plants should come. Understanding these issues is important for developing strategies for furthering the dual goals of water conservation and ecological restoration in the Intermountain West and requires interdisciplinary collaboration between landscape professionals, water scientists, ecologists, and planners.

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Mar 26th, 4:00 PM Mar 26th, 4:15 PM

Conservation Behavior and Native Plant Use in Utah

Space Dynamics Laboratory

Native plant use in Utah’s urban and wild land environments increases with drought and conservation awareness. A survey of the Utah Chapter of American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) reveals recent trends in native plant use, landscape professionals' views on the native plant market in Utah, key information needs and sources. Results also discuss some of the dilemmas landscape professionals face when dealing with market pressures which tend to regionalize the sale of native plants and turn ecologically localized natural resources into products. Current labeling and shipping practices leave consumers asking, “How native is native?” The definition of the term “native” according to geographic location makes a difference to landscape professionals when choosing what plants to use to meet various landscape objectives and from where those plants should come. Understanding these issues is important for developing strategies for furthering the dual goals of water conservation and ecological restoration in the Intermountain West and requires interdisciplinary collaboration between landscape professionals, water scientists, ecologists, and planners.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2004/AllAbstracts/8