Event Title

Effect of Landscape Position on Growth of Age-0 Arctic Grayling

Presenter Information

Peter MacKinnon

Location

Space Dynamics Laboratory

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-25-2004 10:35 AM

End Date

3-25-2004 10:40 AM

Description

Lake-stream linkages are common features of landscapes. The presence of lakes along a stream system generally increases water temperatures and stream productivity. We examined the effects of lakes on stream temperature and productivity and subsequent age-0 Arctic grayling growth in two parallel watersheds within the Toolik Lake LTER site in arctic Alaska. One stream has no headwater lakes whereas the other watershed contains 6 small headwater lakes. Temperatures were higher in the watershed with headwater lakes. In the watershed with warmer average temperatures, age-0 grayling exhibited higher growth rates compared with the grayling in the watershed with lower average temperatures. Our results support the idea that lakes within a watershed significantly impact biological processes occurring in streams. These differences may have important effects on recruitment of arctic grayling, particularly in locations near the northern edge of their geographic range.

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Mar 25th, 10:35 AM Mar 25th, 10:40 AM

Effect of Landscape Position on Growth of Age-0 Arctic Grayling

Space Dynamics Laboratory

Lake-stream linkages are common features of landscapes. The presence of lakes along a stream system generally increases water temperatures and stream productivity. We examined the effects of lakes on stream temperature and productivity and subsequent age-0 Arctic grayling growth in two parallel watersheds within the Toolik Lake LTER site in arctic Alaska. One stream has no headwater lakes whereas the other watershed contains 6 small headwater lakes. Temperatures were higher in the watershed with headwater lakes. In the watershed with warmer average temperatures, age-0 grayling exhibited higher growth rates compared with the grayling in the watershed with lower average temperatures. Our results support the idea that lakes within a watershed significantly impact biological processes occurring in streams. These differences may have important effects on recruitment of arctic grayling, particularly in locations near the northern edge of their geographic range.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2004/AllPosters/18