Event Title

Potential for Collaboration at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed

Presenter Information

Mark Seyfried

Location

ECC 307/309

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

4-6-2007 11:20 AM

End Date

4-6-2007 11:50 AM

Description

The Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) was established 45 years ago to study rangeland hydrology where snow and frozen soil are critical. The watershed, which is located in southwest Idaho, is 240 km2 in extent and has an elevation range of 1100 to 2200 m above sea level. Our work is currently oriented towards answering questions related to: (1) snowmelt hydrology, particularly wind redistribution, energy fluxes, scaling and soil water storage effects; (2) effects of fire and other vegetation control methods on streamflow, groundwater recharge, erosion and grazing animal behavior; and (3) instrumentation/measurement technology design and development, including soil water technology, electromagnetic induction, remote sensing (lidar), precipitation and collocation of instrument packages. The RCEW is heavily instrumented with 36 precipitation sites, 27 meteorological stations, 5 eddy covariance systems, 11 weirs, 6 soil microclimate sites two soil instrumentation sites. The instrumentation is not evenly distributed but weighted toward headwater subcatchments. There are great opportunities for complementary research across sites because most sites have disciplinary bias. At the RCEW, for example, the bias is toward physical hydrology, which leaves open a huge potential for biological and chemical research. These will be described in more detail in the talk.

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Apr 6th, 11:20 AM Apr 6th, 11:50 AM

Potential for Collaboration at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed

ECC 307/309

The Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) was established 45 years ago to study rangeland hydrology where snow and frozen soil are critical. The watershed, which is located in southwest Idaho, is 240 km2 in extent and has an elevation range of 1100 to 2200 m above sea level. Our work is currently oriented towards answering questions related to: (1) snowmelt hydrology, particularly wind redistribution, energy fluxes, scaling and soil water storage effects; (2) effects of fire and other vegetation control methods on streamflow, groundwater recharge, erosion and grazing animal behavior; and (3) instrumentation/measurement technology design and development, including soil water technology, electromagnetic induction, remote sensing (lidar), precipitation and collocation of instrument packages. The RCEW is heavily instrumented with 36 precipitation sites, 27 meteorological stations, 5 eddy covariance systems, 11 weirs, 6 soil microclimate sites two soil instrumentation sites. The instrumentation is not evenly distributed but weighted toward headwater subcatchments. There are great opportunities for complementary research across sites because most sites have disciplinary bias. At the RCEW, for example, the bias is toward physical hydrology, which leaves open a huge potential for biological and chemical research. These will be described in more detail in the talk.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2007/AllAbstracts/47