Event Title

Deseret Ranch Paired Watersheds: Studies of dynamic connections between vegetation, soil and water

Presenter Information

Tamao Kasahara

Location

ECC 216

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences

Start Date

4-5-2007 6:00 PM

End Date

4-5-2007 6:05 PM

Description

An integrated watershed research project that looks at the interaction among vegetation, soil processes and hydrology as the framework for assessing change in water yield associated with conifer encroachment into aspen stands is being conducted in paired watersheds (Bear Canyon and Frost Canyon catchments), headwaters of Weber River. The project, primarily on the Deseret Land and Livestock Ranch, also assesses and evaluates the balance between potential benefits (increase in water yield) vs. ecological cost (productive capacity, ecosystem function, water quality) associated with vegetation manipulation, which is scheduled in the Bear Canyon in 2008. In the past few years, efforts were put to watershed characterization and understanding of dynamic connections among vegetation, soil and stream flow. Some key studies have addressed the effects of vegetation cover types on snow accumulation, melt rate, soil properties, soil water storage and soil carbon storage. The effects of topographic attributes on stream flow generation were also studied. The project will continue with further studies of dynamic interactions among vegetation, soil and water and with monitoring of key variables (e.g. snow accumulation, soil moisture, stream flow) to address watershed response to vegetation manipulations. This research effort and facilities are designed to be integrated into larger-scale watershed research efforts.

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Apr 5th, 6:00 PM Apr 5th, 6:05 PM

Deseret Ranch Paired Watersheds: Studies of dynamic connections between vegetation, soil and water

ECC 216

An integrated watershed research project that looks at the interaction among vegetation, soil processes and hydrology as the framework for assessing change in water yield associated with conifer encroachment into aspen stands is being conducted in paired watersheds (Bear Canyon and Frost Canyon catchments), headwaters of Weber River. The project, primarily on the Deseret Land and Livestock Ranch, also assesses and evaluates the balance between potential benefits (increase in water yield) vs. ecological cost (productive capacity, ecosystem function, water quality) associated with vegetation manipulation, which is scheduled in the Bear Canyon in 2008. In the past few years, efforts were put to watershed characterization and understanding of dynamic connections among vegetation, soil and stream flow. Some key studies have addressed the effects of vegetation cover types on snow accumulation, melt rate, soil properties, soil water storage and soil carbon storage. The effects of topographic attributes on stream flow generation were also studied. The project will continue with further studies of dynamic interactions among vegetation, soil and water and with monitoring of key variables (e.g. snow accumulation, soil moisture, stream flow) to address watershed response to vegetation manipulations. This research effort and facilities are designed to be integrated into larger-scale watershed research efforts.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2007/AllPosters/13