Event Title

Mapping and Monitoring Wetlands Using Airborne Multispectral Imagery

Presenter Information

Christopher M. U Neale

Location

ECC 307/309

Event Website

https://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-31-2008 4:30 PM

End Date

3-31-2008 4:45 PM

Description

Wetland areas in the semiarid west of the United States play an important ecohydrological role. The size, location and function of wetlands are affected by numerous factors such as variations in water availability, water quality, geomorphic characteristics and anthropogenic factors such as runoff from irrigation systems, or discharge of urban effluents. Typically, wetland vegetation occurs in patches of variable size and plant species composition, requiring high-resolution imagery to accurately identify distribution and extent of the different wetland habitat types when mapping these complex systems. Airborne multispectral digital imaging offers several advantages, including costeffectiveness and ability to resolve wetland features ranging in size from a few meters to hundreds of hectares. This paper describes the mapping of wetland habitats within the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem using high resolution multispectral imagery (1-m pixels). Image classification was based on super¬vised signature extraction supported by comprehensive ground truth. An error analysis was conducted using independent ground truth data, and the resulting classification accuracy for the final wetland resource map was 92%.

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Mar 31st, 4:30 PM Mar 31st, 4:45 PM

Mapping and Monitoring Wetlands Using Airborne Multispectral Imagery

ECC 307/309

Wetland areas in the semiarid west of the United States play an important ecohydrological role. The size, location and function of wetlands are affected by numerous factors such as variations in water availability, water quality, geomorphic characteristics and anthropogenic factors such as runoff from irrigation systems, or discharge of urban effluents. Typically, wetland vegetation occurs in patches of variable size and plant species composition, requiring high-resolution imagery to accurately identify distribution and extent of the different wetland habitat types when mapping these complex systems. Airborne multispectral digital imaging offers several advantages, including costeffectiveness and ability to resolve wetland features ranging in size from a few meters to hundreds of hectares. This paper describes the mapping of wetland habitats within the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem using high resolution multispectral imagery (1-m pixels). Image classification was based on super¬vised signature extraction supported by comprehensive ground truth. An error analysis was conducted using independent ground truth data, and the resulting classification accuracy for the final wetland resource map was 92%.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2008/AllAbstracts/18