Event Title

Monitoring Thermal Springs in Yellowstone Park Using High Resolution Imagery

Presenter Information

Christopher M. U. Neale

Location

ECC 307/309

Event Website

https://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-31-2008 11:30 AM

End Date

3-31-2008 11:45 AM

Description

High-resolution multispectral images in the visible (green, red), near-infrared and thermal infrared (8-12 μm) portions of the spectrum were acquired using the Utah State University airborne multispectral system over several active thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park. The ongoing monitoring program initiated during the Fall of 2005, continued in the Fall of 2006 and 2007. The imagery was acquired under clear sky conditions at two different times of the day, early afternoon and midnight, with the objective of studying the thermal inertia properties of the materials and surfaces surrounding the different active spring areas flown. The presentation will describe the image acquisition and processing methodology, as well as surface emissivity and atmospheric corrections conducted to obtain at-surface temperatures. Examples of the products obtained over the Upper, Middle and Lower Geyser Basin, Old Faithful area as well as the Sour Creek Resurgent Dome area will be shown. An example of the use of thermal infrared technology for the study of thermal mixing in rivers will be given.

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Mar 31st, 11:30 AM Mar 31st, 11:45 AM

Monitoring Thermal Springs in Yellowstone Park Using High Resolution Imagery

ECC 307/309

High-resolution multispectral images in the visible (green, red), near-infrared and thermal infrared (8-12 μm) portions of the spectrum were acquired using the Utah State University airborne multispectral system over several active thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park. The ongoing monitoring program initiated during the Fall of 2005, continued in the Fall of 2006 and 2007. The imagery was acquired under clear sky conditions at two different times of the day, early afternoon and midnight, with the objective of studying the thermal inertia properties of the materials and surfaces surrounding the different active spring areas flown. The presentation will describe the image acquisition and processing methodology, as well as surface emissivity and atmospheric corrections conducted to obtain at-surface temperatures. Examples of the products obtained over the Upper, Middle and Lower Geyser Basin, Old Faithful area as well as the Sour Creek Resurgent Dome area will be shown. An example of the use of thermal infrared technology for the study of thermal mixing in rivers will be given.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2008/AllAbstracts/7