Event Title

Determination of the Physical Properties of Cache Valley Aquifers

Presenter Information

Paul Inkenbrandt

Location

ECC 216

Event Website

https://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-31-2008 6:15 PM

End Date

3-31-2008 6:20 PM

Description

This study is being performed within the Utah portion of Cache Valley. Increasing population and recent drought cycles in Cache Valley, Utah and Idaho, have increased the need for additional water supplies. The primary purpose of this project is to measure the in-situ transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, and storativity of the hydrostratigraphic units of Cache Valley. Accurate, quantitative values of hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, and storativity are necessary to properly conduct simulations that give reasonable estimates on the availability of Cache Valley’s water resources. Data sources for these parameters include field work, government agency files, and water well records. All of the aquifer physical parameter data is being compiled, and a comprehensive GIS map and database is being constructed. Preliminary results conclude that transmissivity is highest in the unconsolidated gravels in the Logan/Smithfield area and decreases radially from that area. This study also supports that a large number of privately owned water wells penetrate the consolidated Salt Lake Formation, a formation previously thought to be unsuitable for water supply.

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Mar 31st, 6:15 PM Mar 31st, 6:20 PM

Determination of the Physical Properties of Cache Valley Aquifers

ECC 216

This study is being performed within the Utah portion of Cache Valley. Increasing population and recent drought cycles in Cache Valley, Utah and Idaho, have increased the need for additional water supplies. The primary purpose of this project is to measure the in-situ transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, and storativity of the hydrostratigraphic units of Cache Valley. Accurate, quantitative values of hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, and storativity are necessary to properly conduct simulations that give reasonable estimates on the availability of Cache Valley’s water resources. Data sources for these parameters include field work, government agency files, and water well records. All of the aquifer physical parameter data is being compiled, and a comprehensive GIS map and database is being constructed. Preliminary results conclude that transmissivity is highest in the unconsolidated gravels in the Logan/Smithfield area and decreases radially from that area. This study also supports that a large number of privately owned water wells penetrate the consolidated Salt Lake Formation, a formation previously thought to be unsuitable for water supply.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2008/Posters/14