Event Title

Modeling and Analysis of the Impact of the Great Salt Lake on Local Climate

Presenter Information

Jiming Jin
Lijuan Wen

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

4-20-2010 2:20 PM

End Date

4-20-2010 2:40 PM

Description

The impact of the Great Salt Lake (GSL) on the locate climate is studied with an advanced regional climate model, the Weather Forecast and Research Model (WRF) coupled with a sophisticated 10-layer lake model. Both regional climate and lake models were developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The simulations were evaluated with MesoWest observations over the GSL surface and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface skin temperature. The initial results show that the WRF model can reproduce the surface observations and remotely sensed data. In addition, more precipitation is seen over the downstream area of the GSL in the spring and fall seasons. The high water salinity in the lake decreases surface evaporation and makes ice free in the winter even though the simulated water temperature is below 0 oC. At the same time, the unfrozen lake often produces an unstable lower atmosphere during the winter and produces stronger precipitation. The scope of the lake-influenced area is affected by the wind intensity and directions.

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Apr 20th, 2:20 PM Apr 20th, 2:40 PM

Modeling and Analysis of the Impact of the Great Salt Lake on Local Climate

Eccles Conference Center

The impact of the Great Salt Lake (GSL) on the locate climate is studied with an advanced regional climate model, the Weather Forecast and Research Model (WRF) coupled with a sophisticated 10-layer lake model. Both regional climate and lake models were developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The simulations were evaluated with MesoWest observations over the GSL surface and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface skin temperature. The initial results show that the WRF model can reproduce the surface observations and remotely sensed data. In addition, more precipitation is seen over the downstream area of the GSL in the spring and fall seasons. The high water salinity in the lake decreases surface evaporation and makes ice free in the winter even though the simulated water temperature is below 0 oC. At the same time, the unfrozen lake often produces an unstable lower atmosphere during the winter and produces stronger precipitation. The scope of the lake-influenced area is affected by the wind intensity and directions.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2010/AllAbstracts/13