Event Title

Effects of Beaver on Curtis Creek

Presenter Information

Camilla Lyman

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

4-20-2010 10:25 AM

End Date

4-20-2010 10:30 AM

Description

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources determined that beaver assist in stream restoration which leads to benefits for other wildlife species. In September of 2008, beaver moved into a portion of Curtis Creek which is located on Hardware Ranch in Blacksmith Fork Canyon. Prior to the beaver constructing the five dams, stream flow and temperature information had been collected at the boundaries of a -560 m reach during Summer 2008. Following the beaver arrival, data collection continued at the reach boundaries. Comparing months June, July, and August 2008 with June, July and August 2009, we found that when averaging the flow and temperature info on a monthly scale, there appeared to be little or no difference between the summers. However, comparing the information on a smaller daily temporal scale, we found a larger increase in temperatures over the reach for June and July after the beaver dams were built. Also, before the beaver dams were in place, the reach was consistently losing. After the beaver dams were introduced, significant gains and losses were no longer observed. Understanding that beaver have a role in altering the stream flow and temperature for a given area can assist in determining the effect beaver have on the ecological surroundings. Additionally, high frequency data collection provided more information regarding the site specific impacts of these impoundments.

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Apr 20th, 10:25 AM Apr 20th, 10:30 AM

Effects of Beaver on Curtis Creek

Eccles Conference Center

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources determined that beaver assist in stream restoration which leads to benefits for other wildlife species. In September of 2008, beaver moved into a portion of Curtis Creek which is located on Hardware Ranch in Blacksmith Fork Canyon. Prior to the beaver constructing the five dams, stream flow and temperature information had been collected at the boundaries of a -560 m reach during Summer 2008. Following the beaver arrival, data collection continued at the reach boundaries. Comparing months June, July, and August 2008 with June, July and August 2009, we found that when averaging the flow and temperature info on a monthly scale, there appeared to be little or no difference between the summers. However, comparing the information on a smaller daily temporal scale, we found a larger increase in temperatures over the reach for June and July after the beaver dams were built. Also, before the beaver dams were in place, the reach was consistently losing. After the beaver dams were introduced, significant gains and losses were no longer observed. Understanding that beaver have a role in altering the stream flow and temperature for a given area can assist in determining the effect beaver have on the ecological surroundings. Additionally, high frequency data collection provided more information regarding the site specific impacts of these impoundments.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2010/Posters/15