Event Title

Response of Glacier to Climate Change in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Presenter Information

Hazel Reynolds
Glenn Thackray

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

4-21-2010 10:20 AM

End Date

4-21-2010 10:25 AM

Description

This study evaluates recent ice area changes of the small, remote glaciers in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Findings for the Teton Glaciers include shrinking ice masses in or after warmer and drier years. This study uses map and photographic data analysis (remote sensing), field mapping, and analysis of meteorological data. Sources of remote sensing data include United States Geological Survey topographic maps, QuickBird imagery, and aerial photos. To calibrate remote sensing data, at least two representative glaciers were studied in the field. Field work recorded glacier geometry and added to the ground-based photo record. Meteorological data collected by nearby National Weather Service Cooperative Observer Program stations are used to compare ice area change to regional records of temperature and precipitation. Preliminary data indicate that the Schoolroom Glacier experienced a maximum of 23% increase in ice area between 1994 and 2001. The glacier then decreased by a maximum of 16% in area from 2001 to 2006. Imagery of all Teton Range glaciers in 2009 showed substantial cover of snow on ice, rendering ice margins difficult to determine during the late summer end of the ablation season. Climate records offer some insight to these ice area changes. Between 1994 and 2001, mean annual temperatures recorded in Moose, WY varied within 1°C while the annual sum of precipitation varied between 30 and 82 cm. During this time period, the ice area increased. Between 2001 and 2006, the mean annual temperature varied within 2°C and the annual sum of precipitation increased by 22 cm. During this time period, the area of ice margins decreased. The storage of water in glaciers at river headwaters affects regional river flows. In turn, the status of the Teton glaciers characterize the quality of hydrologic, ecologic, and aesthetic resources of the Park and surrounding region.

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Apr 21st, 10:20 AM Apr 21st, 10:25 AM

Response of Glacier to Climate Change in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Eccles Conference Center

This study evaluates recent ice area changes of the small, remote glaciers in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Findings for the Teton Glaciers include shrinking ice masses in or after warmer and drier years. This study uses map and photographic data analysis (remote sensing), field mapping, and analysis of meteorological data. Sources of remote sensing data include United States Geological Survey topographic maps, QuickBird imagery, and aerial photos. To calibrate remote sensing data, at least two representative glaciers were studied in the field. Field work recorded glacier geometry and added to the ground-based photo record. Meteorological data collected by nearby National Weather Service Cooperative Observer Program stations are used to compare ice area change to regional records of temperature and precipitation. Preliminary data indicate that the Schoolroom Glacier experienced a maximum of 23% increase in ice area between 1994 and 2001. The glacier then decreased by a maximum of 16% in area from 2001 to 2006. Imagery of all Teton Range glaciers in 2009 showed substantial cover of snow on ice, rendering ice margins difficult to determine during the late summer end of the ablation season. Climate records offer some insight to these ice area changes. Between 1994 and 2001, mean annual temperatures recorded in Moose, WY varied within 1°C while the annual sum of precipitation varied between 30 and 82 cm. During this time period, the ice area increased. Between 2001 and 2006, the mean annual temperature varied within 2°C and the annual sum of precipitation increased by 22 cm. During this time period, the area of ice margins decreased. The storage of water in glaciers at river headwaters affects regional river flows. In turn, the status of the Teton glaciers characterize the quality of hydrologic, ecologic, and aesthetic resources of the Park and surrounding region.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2010/Posters/6