Event Title

Can we give fish more energy without giving them more food? Project update for a modeling investigation

Presenter Information

Eric Wall

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-29-2011 10:00 AM

End Date

3-29-2011 10:20 AM

Description

To better understand and apply how changes in fish habitat (e.g. stream restoration) affect stream fish, we need to understand the mechanisms by which biotic and abiotic factors influence fish populations. We are using a process-based model to investigate the influence of streambed topography on energy available to drift-feeding fish. The process-based model uses hydraulics, spatial distribution of drifting food items, and foraging behavior to estimate the net rate of energy intake for drift-feeding fish in a stream reach. To data, we have collected the information needed to populate the model including streambed topography, temperature, drifting invertebrate biomass, growth rates, and density estimates for juvenile steelhead for multiple reaches of a headwater stream in Southeastern Washington. We have built a computational mesh for the 2D hydraulic simulation and calibrated the hydraulic model to depth and velocity estimates calculated in HEC-RAS. We plan to accurately calibrate and validate the hydraulic, drifting transport, and foraging fish models. A final modeling investigation will allow us to manipulate food availability, temperature, and channel structure to examine the relative influences of these factors on the energy budgets of drift-feeding fish and how they might affect growth and carrying capacity. In addition, the model will be used to provide predictions on the expected impacts of stream restoration on these fish performance metrics.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 29th, 10:00 AM Mar 29th, 10:20 AM

Can we give fish more energy without giving them more food? Project update for a modeling investigation

Eccles Conference Center

To better understand and apply how changes in fish habitat (e.g. stream restoration) affect stream fish, we need to understand the mechanisms by which biotic and abiotic factors influence fish populations. We are using a process-based model to investigate the influence of streambed topography on energy available to drift-feeding fish. The process-based model uses hydraulics, spatial distribution of drifting food items, and foraging behavior to estimate the net rate of energy intake for drift-feeding fish in a stream reach. To data, we have collected the information needed to populate the model including streambed topography, temperature, drifting invertebrate biomass, growth rates, and density estimates for juvenile steelhead for multiple reaches of a headwater stream in Southeastern Washington. We have built a computational mesh for the 2D hydraulic simulation and calibrated the hydraulic model to depth and velocity estimates calculated in HEC-RAS. We plan to accurately calibrate and validate the hydraulic, drifting transport, and foraging fish models. A final modeling investigation will allow us to manipulate food availability, temperature, and channel structure to examine the relative influences of these factors on the energy budgets of drift-feeding fish and how they might affect growth and carrying capacity. In addition, the model will be used to provide predictions on the expected impacts of stream restoration on these fish performance metrics.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2011/AllAbstracts/8