Event Title

Carbon Source and Fe(III) Depletion Affection TCE Dechlorination in Aquifer Solid from Hill Air Force Base

Presenter Information

Kristen Yeager

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-29-2011 10:10 AM

End Date

3-29-2011 10:15 AM

Description

Trichloroethylene (TCE) has been a common groundwater contaminant at military bases, including Hill Air Force Base (HAFB). TCE may be microbially reduced to dichloroethylene (DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), then to non-toxic ethene and ethane. Biostimulation, where carbon sources and electron donors are added to the contaminated site, can encourage this process, and has been a popular in situ method for removing TCE from groundwater. Microcosms were constructed to observe the impact of different carbon sources: glucose, acetate and whey, on TCE dechlorination in aquifer solid from HAFB. The concentration of Fe(lIl) was also monitored to determine whether the presence of Fe(lIl) inhibits TCE reduction as earlier studies have suggested. The results from this study, however, indicates that TCE dechlorination occurs while Fe(lIl) is present. The type of carbon source also affects the rate of microbial activity, and therefore the rate of TCE dechlorination. TCE products (DCE and VC) were observed in whey and glucose added microcosms, indicating that TCE dechlorination was present. No TCE products were observed in the acetate added microcosms, suggesting that the TCE reduction rate in these microcosms are lower than the ones with glucose and whey added microcosms.

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Mar 29th, 10:10 AM Mar 29th, 10:15 AM

Carbon Source and Fe(III) Depletion Affection TCE Dechlorination in Aquifer Solid from Hill Air Force Base

Eccles Conference Center

Trichloroethylene (TCE) has been a common groundwater contaminant at military bases, including Hill Air Force Base (HAFB). TCE may be microbially reduced to dichloroethylene (DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), then to non-toxic ethene and ethane. Biostimulation, where carbon sources and electron donors are added to the contaminated site, can encourage this process, and has been a popular in situ method for removing TCE from groundwater. Microcosms were constructed to observe the impact of different carbon sources: glucose, acetate and whey, on TCE dechlorination in aquifer solid from HAFB. The concentration of Fe(lIl) was also monitored to determine whether the presence of Fe(lIl) inhibits TCE reduction as earlier studies have suggested. The results from this study, however, indicates that TCE dechlorination occurs while Fe(lIl) is present. The type of carbon source also affects the rate of microbial activity, and therefore the rate of TCE dechlorination. TCE products (DCE and VC) were observed in whey and glucose added microcosms, indicating that TCE dechlorination was present. No TCE products were observed in the acetate added microcosms, suggesting that the TCE reduction rate in these microcosms are lower than the ones with glucose and whey added microcosms.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2011/Posters/14