Event Title

Linking Long-Term Sediment Dynamics and Aquatic Habitat in the Columbia River Watershed

Presenter Information

Elijah Portugal

Location

ECC 216

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

4-3-2012 5:40 PM

End Date

4-3-2012 5:45 PM

Description

Long-term erosion rates and sediment delivery to stream networks can be characterized by unsteadiness both in time and space. Furthermore, erosion and sediment delivery are driven by large, relatively infrequent events, which is particularly apparent at small spatial scales. Within this context, eco-geomorphic interactions occur across a range of spatial and temporal scales from the level of the entire watershed to an individual riffle. Through a combination of GIS analysis, field mapping, rapid geomorphic assessments and cosmogenic nuclide dating I will begin to address three broad scientific questions that form the basis for my MS thesis. 1) How do long-term rates of sediment supply vary spatially and temporally throughout the Columbia River watershed? 2) How have human activities influenced (amplified or dampened) processes of erosion and sediment transport? 3) At what scales do long-term and near-term erosion rates influence aquatic habitat metrics? These broad questions will be addressed within specific nested watersheds of the John Day River, a tributary to the Columbia River. Within these watersheds I will be taking advantage of natural and anthropogenic ‘experiments’ to help constrain spatial heterogeneity and unsteadiness of sediment production as well as assess sensitivity to perturbations.

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Apr 3rd, 5:40 PM Apr 3rd, 5:45 PM

Linking Long-Term Sediment Dynamics and Aquatic Habitat in the Columbia River Watershed

ECC 216

Long-term erosion rates and sediment delivery to stream networks can be characterized by unsteadiness both in time and space. Furthermore, erosion and sediment delivery are driven by large, relatively infrequent events, which is particularly apparent at small spatial scales. Within this context, eco-geomorphic interactions occur across a range of spatial and temporal scales from the level of the entire watershed to an individual riffle. Through a combination of GIS analysis, field mapping, rapid geomorphic assessments and cosmogenic nuclide dating I will begin to address three broad scientific questions that form the basis for my MS thesis. 1) How do long-term rates of sediment supply vary spatially and temporally throughout the Columbia River watershed? 2) How have human activities influenced (amplified or dampened) processes of erosion and sediment transport? 3) At what scales do long-term and near-term erosion rates influence aquatic habitat metrics? These broad questions will be addressed within specific nested watersheds of the John Day River, a tributary to the Columbia River. Within these watersheds I will be taking advantage of natural and anthropogenic ‘experiments’ to help constrain spatial heterogeneity and unsteadiness of sediment production as well as assess sensitivity to perturbations.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2012/Posters/4