Event Title

The impact of coarse particulate organic matter in storm drains on oxygen consumption in the Jordan River

Presenter Information

Jacob Richardson
R. Ryan Dupont

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

4-1-2014 11:40 AM

End Date

4-1-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) is an essential part of the food chain in aquatic ecosystems because it represents a readily available carbon and energy source. The process by which it decomposes in rivers has been well studied and documented. However, the rate and extent of biodegradability of various CPOM components (i.e., twigs, leaves, grass, etc.) in storm drains is not well understood. The Jordan River TMDL study identified stormwater generated CPOM as a likely cause of low dissolved oxygen levels in the lower Jordan River, but recent investigations have suggested that dissolved organic matter generated from this CPOM in storm drains and culverts entering into the Jordan River, rather than the CPOM itself, is the main driver of oxygen impairment. The degradability of CPOM components transported and stored in the storm drain system was studied to understand its relative impact on dissolved oxygen and nutrient status in the Jordan River. Results indicate the generation of highly degradable organic material is a function of the starting CPOM. Details of the experimental results and implications for future management of storm water discharge impacts to be discussed.

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Apr 1st, 11:40 AM Apr 1st, 12:00 PM

The impact of coarse particulate organic matter in storm drains on oxygen consumption in the Jordan River

Eccles Conference Center

Coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) is an essential part of the food chain in aquatic ecosystems because it represents a readily available carbon and energy source. The process by which it decomposes in rivers has been well studied and documented. However, the rate and extent of biodegradability of various CPOM components (i.e., twigs, leaves, grass, etc.) in storm drains is not well understood. The Jordan River TMDL study identified stormwater generated CPOM as a likely cause of low dissolved oxygen levels in the lower Jordan River, but recent investigations have suggested that dissolved organic matter generated from this CPOM in storm drains and culverts entering into the Jordan River, rather than the CPOM itself, is the main driver of oxygen impairment. The degradability of CPOM components transported and stored in the storm drain system was studied to understand its relative impact on dissolved oxygen and nutrient status in the Jordan River. Results indicate the generation of highly degradable organic material is a function of the starting CPOM. Details of the experimental results and implications for future management of storm water discharge impacts to be discussed.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2014/2014Abstracts/21