Event Title

Restoration and monitoring plan for native fish and riparian vegetation on the San Rafael River, Utah

Presenter Information

Brian Laub
Justin Jimenez
Phaedra Budy

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

4-2-2014 5:15 PM

End Date

4-2-2014 5:30 PM

Description

The San Rafael River, a tributary to the Green River in the Upper Colorado River Basin, has a severely altered flow regime, poor stream and riparian habitat quality, and reduced populations of native fish. Yet, three species of native desert fish (flannelmouth sucker Catostomus latipinnis, bluehead sucker Catostomus discobolus, and roundtail chub Gila robusta) persist in the San Rafael River, and therefore it is an important river for conservation of these fish species. Over the past year, extensive effort has been devoted to developing a restoration plan for native fish and vegetation on the San Rafael River. Development of the restoration plan followed a systematic planning process that incorporated available scientific information at each stage. Goals and objectives for the restoration plan were developed by integrating information on historical river changes with a vision for the eventual outcome of restoration. Specific restoration actions were developed that are likely to enhance natural river processes of flooding, sediment transport, and channel movement. Sites were selected for restoration actions using a systematic prioritization process that incorporated information on native and non-native fish distribution, riparian vegetation communities, and geomorphic channel properties. Sites currently providing complex fish habitat and native vegetation stands were also identified through the prioritization process and will be targeted for conservation rather than restoration. An intensive monitoring program was also developed to understand the impacts of restoration over time and to support an adaptive management approach to restoration. In this presentation, we will summarize development of the restoration and monitoring plan and discuss how the planning process may be adaptable to other restoration projects.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 5:15 PM Apr 2nd, 5:30 PM

Restoration and monitoring plan for native fish and riparian vegetation on the San Rafael River, Utah

Eccles Conference Center

The San Rafael River, a tributary to the Green River in the Upper Colorado River Basin, has a severely altered flow regime, poor stream and riparian habitat quality, and reduced populations of native fish. Yet, three species of native desert fish (flannelmouth sucker Catostomus latipinnis, bluehead sucker Catostomus discobolus, and roundtail chub Gila robusta) persist in the San Rafael River, and therefore it is an important river for conservation of these fish species. Over the past year, extensive effort has been devoted to developing a restoration plan for native fish and vegetation on the San Rafael River. Development of the restoration plan followed a systematic planning process that incorporated available scientific information at each stage. Goals and objectives for the restoration plan were developed by integrating information on historical river changes with a vision for the eventual outcome of restoration. Specific restoration actions were developed that are likely to enhance natural river processes of flooding, sediment transport, and channel movement. Sites were selected for restoration actions using a systematic prioritization process that incorporated information on native and non-native fish distribution, riparian vegetation communities, and geomorphic channel properties. Sites currently providing complex fish habitat and native vegetation stands were also identified through the prioritization process and will be targeted for conservation rather than restoration. An intensive monitoring program was also developed to understand the impacts of restoration over time and to support an adaptive management approach to restoration. In this presentation, we will summarize development of the restoration and monitoring plan and discuss how the planning process may be adaptable to other restoration projects.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2014/2014Abstracts/34