Event Title

The Effect of Duck Ingestion and Seed Size on Seed Dormancy Loss in Wetland Bulrushes

Location

Eccles Conference Center Auditorium

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

3-31-2015 9:40 AM

End Date

3-31-2015 9:50 AM

Description

Waterfowl have been shown to be important dispersers of different species of aquatic plants and waterfowl digestion of seeds can affect seed dormancy loss. The impact of digestion on seeds of different sizes may also differentially affect seed dormancy loss. In this study, we are looking at seed size in relation to dormancy loss in two bulrush species (Schoenoplectus spp.). Specifically, we are evaluating mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and northern pintail (Anus acuta) ducks and their effects on three species of bulrush (alkali Schoenoplectus maritimus (large seeds), hardstem S. acutus (small seeds), and threesquare S. americanus (small seeds)). Seeds were collected from the gizzards of hunter harvested ducks. Then, seeds were incubated in the greenhouse at summer temperatures. After germination the seeds were counted and removed. We tested for any significant difference in dormancy loss between large and small seed size after duck ingestion. Our results were compared to undigested seeds (i.e., controls) in an on-going companion seed study. Preliminary results of the study show that duck ingestion has a significant impact on germination percentages. On average, alkali bulrush ingested seeds germinated at 39.4% compared to 1% in control seeds. In the smaller seeded species, 50% of the duck ingested seeds germinated compared to only 6.6% in the control seeds. Our findings suggest a means to produce large numbers of bulrush seedlings to restore habitat in ares cleared of invasive Phragmites australis.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 31st, 9:40 AM Mar 31st, 9:50 AM

The Effect of Duck Ingestion and Seed Size on Seed Dormancy Loss in Wetland Bulrushes

Eccles Conference Center Auditorium

Waterfowl have been shown to be important dispersers of different species of aquatic plants and waterfowl digestion of seeds can affect seed dormancy loss. The impact of digestion on seeds of different sizes may also differentially affect seed dormancy loss. In this study, we are looking at seed size in relation to dormancy loss in two bulrush species (Schoenoplectus spp.). Specifically, we are evaluating mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and northern pintail (Anus acuta) ducks and their effects on three species of bulrush (alkali Schoenoplectus maritimus (large seeds), hardstem S. acutus (small seeds), and threesquare S. americanus (small seeds)). Seeds were collected from the gizzards of hunter harvested ducks. Then, seeds were incubated in the greenhouse at summer temperatures. After germination the seeds were counted and removed. We tested for any significant difference in dormancy loss between large and small seed size after duck ingestion. Our results were compared to undigested seeds (i.e., controls) in an on-going companion seed study. Preliminary results of the study show that duck ingestion has a significant impact on germination percentages. On average, alkali bulrush ingested seeds germinated at 39.4% compared to 1% in control seeds. In the smaller seeded species, 50% of the duck ingested seeds germinated compared to only 6.6% in the control seeds. Our findings suggest a means to produce large numbers of bulrush seedlings to restore habitat in ares cleared of invasive Phragmites australis.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2015/2015Posters/28