Event Title

The Impact of Aeolian Dust on Trace Element Chemistry of Snowpack in Four Watersheds around Utah and Nevada

Presenter Information

Dylan Dastrup

Location

Eccles Conference Center Auditorium

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

3-31-2015 9:10 AM

End Date

3-31-2015 9:20 AM

Description

Aeolian dust plays an important role in the transport and deposition of trace elements to ecosystems. Over the past 150 years, the Intermountain West has seen a 5-7 fold increase in dust deposition to high alpine lakes, resulting in a 400% increase in trace metal loading. Climate change is expected to increase dust storm frequency and intensity yet little is known about the impact of dust on water quality in high alpine watersheds. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the spatial variability of the trace element chemistry, composition and deposition of snowpack and dust across four watersheds in Utah and Nevada. During spring 2014, in cooperation with iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Arid-region Hydro-sustainability), snow, and dust samples were collected from four watersheds in Utah and Nevada at peak snowpack. During 2013 those same samples were collected in one of the Utah watersheds. Samples were analyzed for trace and major elements, stable water isotopes and 87Sr/86Sr. Preliminary results from snow and dust samples indicate concentrations of Ca, Rb, Mn, Sm, Gd, Ho, Tl were larger in 2014 than 2013 by a factor of 2 for the same area in the Uinta Mountains in Utah. In 2014 concentrations of Mn, Pb, U, Li, Eu, Ti, Nd, Rb, and Ni in snow and dust ranged by factors of 2-8 across all watersheds. In 2014 particulate matter (>0.45µm) dominated the snowpack chemistry suggesting dust as a primary contributor of trace elements. Dust loads for dust deposited onto snow pack indicate Li, Mg, Al, Tl, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, As, Rb, Y, Cs, La, Ce, Nd and U were on average 27% higher for the Logan watershed than the other three watersheds. Dust from the Logan watershed had unique 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios and responded differently to acetic and nitric acid leeches than the dust from the other three sample locations. This suggests different dust sources between the Logan and other three watersheds.

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Mar 31st, 9:10 AM Mar 31st, 9:20 AM

The Impact of Aeolian Dust on Trace Element Chemistry of Snowpack in Four Watersheds around Utah and Nevada

Eccles Conference Center Auditorium

Aeolian dust plays an important role in the transport and deposition of trace elements to ecosystems. Over the past 150 years, the Intermountain West has seen a 5-7 fold increase in dust deposition to high alpine lakes, resulting in a 400% increase in trace metal loading. Climate change is expected to increase dust storm frequency and intensity yet little is known about the impact of dust on water quality in high alpine watersheds. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the spatial variability of the trace element chemistry, composition and deposition of snowpack and dust across four watersheds in Utah and Nevada. During spring 2014, in cooperation with iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Arid-region Hydro-sustainability), snow, and dust samples were collected from four watersheds in Utah and Nevada at peak snowpack. During 2013 those same samples were collected in one of the Utah watersheds. Samples were analyzed for trace and major elements, stable water isotopes and 87Sr/86Sr. Preliminary results from snow and dust samples indicate concentrations of Ca, Rb, Mn, Sm, Gd, Ho, Tl were larger in 2014 than 2013 by a factor of 2 for the same area in the Uinta Mountains in Utah. In 2014 concentrations of Mn, Pb, U, Li, Eu, Ti, Nd, Rb, and Ni in snow and dust ranged by factors of 2-8 across all watersheds. In 2014 particulate matter (>0.45µm) dominated the snowpack chemistry suggesting dust as a primary contributor of trace elements. Dust loads for dust deposited onto snow pack indicate Li, Mg, Al, Tl, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, As, Rb, Y, Cs, La, Ce, Nd and U were on average 27% higher for the Logan watershed than the other three watersheds. Dust from the Logan watershed had unique 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios and responded differently to acetic and nitric acid leeches than the dust from the other three sample locations. This suggests different dust sources between the Logan and other three watersheds.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2015/2015Posters/31