Event Title

Variability of Bacterial Communities with Depth in Bioretention Systems of Semi-arid Climate

Presenter Information

Pratibha Sapkota

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

4-6-2016 11:00 AM

End Date

4-6-2016 11:15 AM

Description

Microorganisms exist throughout the soil profile and play an important role in nutrient cycling. However, the distribution of microbes in bioretention remains poorly understood. Most of the agronomic studies on microorganisms focus on microbes distribution in the surface horizon. We quantified the changes in bacterial communities with depth within bioretention system with different treatments:-upland-native vegetation, wetland-wetland vegetation, and control-no vegetation. Soil samples were taken from top 10 cm, 50cm, and 1 m of all bioretention systems with different treatments. Bacterial community composition was determined by using 16S rRNA gene-based analysis. DNA was extracted from soil samples and 16S metagenomic sequencing was performed on the samples. The results suggest that the changes in environmental conditions with soil depth represent strong ecological filters for bacterial communities. The results showed that the most pronounced microbial activity occurs in the upper horizon and the abundance decrease markedly with depth. Results showed a higher abundance of bacteriotides and proteobacteria. However, the abundance of other bacteria did not vary within various depth. Bacteriotides in soil are typically decomposers; therefore, higher abundance of bacteriotides on soil surface denotes increased C availability. Proteobacteria are gram negative bacteria, and they represent a diverse range of organisms such as nitrifying bacteria. Therefore, the presence of these bacteria could mean the occurrence of nitrification in bioretention systems. In this study, we summarized the abundance of the dominant bacterial population in bioretention. Knowing the abundance of microbes in bioretention is important because microbial community composition may be one of the important control on soil processes and microbial composition abundance allow us to access the conditions of the soil.

Comments

An oral presentation by Pratibha Sapkota, who is with the University of Utah, Civil and Environmental Engineering

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Apr 6th, 11:00 AM Apr 6th, 11:15 AM

Variability of Bacterial Communities with Depth in Bioretention Systems of Semi-arid Climate

USU Eccles Conference Center

Microorganisms exist throughout the soil profile and play an important role in nutrient cycling. However, the distribution of microbes in bioretention remains poorly understood. Most of the agronomic studies on microorganisms focus on microbes distribution in the surface horizon. We quantified the changes in bacterial communities with depth within bioretention system with different treatments:-upland-native vegetation, wetland-wetland vegetation, and control-no vegetation. Soil samples were taken from top 10 cm, 50cm, and 1 m of all bioretention systems with different treatments. Bacterial community composition was determined by using 16S rRNA gene-based analysis. DNA was extracted from soil samples and 16S metagenomic sequencing was performed on the samples. The results suggest that the changes in environmental conditions with soil depth represent strong ecological filters for bacterial communities. The results showed that the most pronounced microbial activity occurs in the upper horizon and the abundance decrease markedly with depth. Results showed a higher abundance of bacteriotides and proteobacteria. However, the abundance of other bacteria did not vary within various depth. Bacteriotides in soil are typically decomposers; therefore, higher abundance of bacteriotides on soil surface denotes increased C availability. Proteobacteria are gram negative bacteria, and they represent a diverse range of organisms such as nitrifying bacteria. Therefore, the presence of these bacteria could mean the occurrence of nitrification in bioretention systems. In this study, we summarized the abundance of the dominant bacterial population in bioretention. Knowing the abundance of microbes in bioretention is important because microbial community composition may be one of the important control on soil processes and microbial composition abundance allow us to access the conditions of the soil.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2016/2016Abstracts/9