Event Title

Heber City Canals: an Update of Flow Monitoring Stations

Presenter Information

Jared Brabazon
Greg Carling

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

4-5-2016 5:18 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 5:21 PM

Description

Urbanization and agricultural landuse have great impacts on urban stream hydrology. Heber City is one of Utah’s fastest growing municipalities with ongoing development from agricultural to urban landuse. To assess hydrological impacts from landuse change, flow monitoring stations were installed in Spring and Center Creek canals in Heber City. These sensors observe flow conditions of the canals in fifteen minute increments, thus allowing for an extensive dataset. Initial results indicate moderate variability in flow. Changes in flow seem to correlate with precipitation. However, smaller variations in flow may be influenced by other means such as irrigation. Further data, especially during storm and irrigation seasons, will allow a greater understanding of urban and agricultural impacts on urban stream hydrology.

Comments

A poster by Jared Brabazon, who is with Brigham Young University, Geology

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 5:18 PM Apr 5th, 5:21 PM

Heber City Canals: an Update of Flow Monitoring Stations

USU Eccles Conference Center

Urbanization and agricultural landuse have great impacts on urban stream hydrology. Heber City is one of Utah’s fastest growing municipalities with ongoing development from agricultural to urban landuse. To assess hydrological impacts from landuse change, flow monitoring stations were installed in Spring and Center Creek canals in Heber City. These sensors observe flow conditions of the canals in fifteen minute increments, thus allowing for an extensive dataset. Initial results indicate moderate variability in flow. Changes in flow seem to correlate with precipitation. However, smaller variations in flow may be influenced by other means such as irrigation. Further data, especially during storm and irrigation seasons, will allow a greater understanding of urban and agricultural impacts on urban stream hydrology.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2016/2016Posters/17