Event Title

Dormancy Break of Alkali Bulrush Seeds: Effect of Source Population and Length of Cold Stratification

Presenter Information

Casey Trout
Karin Kettenring

Location

Logan Country CLub

Streaming Media

Start Date

3-28-2017 3:15 PM

End Date

3-28-2017 3:20 PM

Description

Great Salt Lake wetlands provide a number of invaluable ecosystem services, including water filtration and migratory bird habitat. Recent invasions of Phragmites australis have greatly reduced the cover of native wetland species, including alkali bulrush. Alkali bulrush is a critical wetland plant which provides valuable nesting habitat and nutritious seeds for migratory birds. Restoration efforts which aim to remove Phragmites and reseed wetlands with native species have proved unsuccessful due to low germination rates of bulrush seed, likely because the seeds are physiologically dormant. In order to break dormancy, seeds must be cold stratified in moist conditions, stimulating wintertime. There is still much uncertainty in the scientific community concerning the length of cold stratification that is most effective at breaking seed dormancy, and whether the effect of cold stratification varies among source populations. Due to different evolutionary histories and site conditions, seeds sourced from different populations are biologically different and may vary in their germination response to cold stratification. This research project examines the effect of various lengths of cold stratification on the germination rates of alkali bulrush seeds collected in Fall of 2015 and 2016 from Sterling Wildlife Management Area, Farmington Bay Waterfowl Management Area, Ogden Bay Waterfowl Management Area, Ogden Bay Waterfowl Management Area, Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, and Salt Creek Waterfowl Management Area. The project results may provide evidence for the most effective length of cold stratification and the genetic differences in alkali bulrush between various source populations.

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Mar 28th, 3:15 PM Mar 28th, 3:20 PM

Dormancy Break of Alkali Bulrush Seeds: Effect of Source Population and Length of Cold Stratification

Logan Country CLub

Great Salt Lake wetlands provide a number of invaluable ecosystem services, including water filtration and migratory bird habitat. Recent invasions of Phragmites australis have greatly reduced the cover of native wetland species, including alkali bulrush. Alkali bulrush is a critical wetland plant which provides valuable nesting habitat and nutritious seeds for migratory birds. Restoration efforts which aim to remove Phragmites and reseed wetlands with native species have proved unsuccessful due to low germination rates of bulrush seed, likely because the seeds are physiologically dormant. In order to break dormancy, seeds must be cold stratified in moist conditions, stimulating wintertime. There is still much uncertainty in the scientific community concerning the length of cold stratification that is most effective at breaking seed dormancy, and whether the effect of cold stratification varies among source populations. Due to different evolutionary histories and site conditions, seeds sourced from different populations are biologically different and may vary in their germination response to cold stratification. This research project examines the effect of various lengths of cold stratification on the germination rates of alkali bulrush seeds collected in Fall of 2015 and 2016 from Sterling Wildlife Management Area, Farmington Bay Waterfowl Management Area, Ogden Bay Waterfowl Management Area, Ogden Bay Waterfowl Management Area, Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, and Salt Creek Waterfowl Management Area. The project results may provide evidence for the most effective length of cold stratification and the genetic differences in alkali bulrush between various source populations.