Event Title

Tracing Changes in Water Chemistry During Spring Runoff Using 87Sr/86Sr in Upper Provo River

Presenter Information

Colin Hale

Location

Logan Country Club

Streaming Media

Start Date

3-28-2017 3:05 PM

End Date

3-28-2017 3:10 PM

Description

Windblown dust deposits on snowpack causes changes in solute and trace element chemistry. Thus, snow and subsequent melt water chemistry is dependent on the influx of dust. The Wasatch Front and surrounding area dust flux is expected to increase from changes in climate. These changes may affect the water supply supporting much of the population along the Wasatch Front. Preliminary sampling occurred between 2014-2016 samples of snow, river, and surface runoff have been collected in the upper Provo River watershed. During 2016, more intensive sampling of the upper Provo River took place with river, snow, and surface runoff samples. Preliminary 87Sr/86Sr results show promise as a tracer to understand changes in water chemistry in the Provo River from impacts of dust in the Uinta Mountain snowpack. However, mixing curves with end members as base flow and snow samples do not explain 87Sr/86Sr ratios of samples taken during spring runoff. This suggests that there is an alternate source of elemental Sr to the system. Future work will consider lake water, soil water, groundwater, and vegetation as alternate end members effecting upper Provo River water chemistry.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 3:05 PM Mar 28th, 3:10 PM

Tracing Changes in Water Chemistry During Spring Runoff Using 87Sr/86Sr in Upper Provo River

Logan Country Club

Windblown dust deposits on snowpack causes changes in solute and trace element chemistry. Thus, snow and subsequent melt water chemistry is dependent on the influx of dust. The Wasatch Front and surrounding area dust flux is expected to increase from changes in climate. These changes may affect the water supply supporting much of the population along the Wasatch Front. Preliminary sampling occurred between 2014-2016 samples of snow, river, and surface runoff have been collected in the upper Provo River watershed. During 2016, more intensive sampling of the upper Provo River took place with river, snow, and surface runoff samples. Preliminary 87Sr/86Sr results show promise as a tracer to understand changes in water chemistry in the Provo River from impacts of dust in the Uinta Mountain snowpack. However, mixing curves with end members as base flow and snow samples do not explain 87Sr/86Sr ratios of samples taken during spring runoff. This suggests that there is an alternate source of elemental Sr to the system. Future work will consider lake water, soil water, groundwater, and vegetation as alternate end members effecting upper Provo River water chemistry.