Event Title

Mass balance evaluation of Lower Knowlton Fork (LKF) watershed, Salt Lake County, Utah

Presenter Information

Sal Limbu
Richard C. Peralta

Location

Logan Country Club

Streaming Media

Start Date

3-28-2017 4:30 PM

End Date

3-28-2017 4:35 PM

Description

As a step toward simulating runoff from the entire Red Butte Creek (RBC) watershed, we use continuous precipitation-runoff simulation to prepare a hydrologic mass balance for the Lower Knowlton Fork (LKF) watershed, an RBC sub-watershed. The RBC watershed drains a narrow canyon with steep side walls. RBC flows southwest into the Jordan River, which drains into the Great Salt Lake. Formed from colluvium and alluvium derived from mixed sedimentary rocks, RBC soils are well-drained and have high infiltration rates. Some infiltrated water percolates and becomes groundwater. Groundwater that returns to Red Butte Creek increases the creek’s base flow. And ultimately affects Jordan River flow. RBC watershed elevations range from 1,500 to 2,524m. Annual precipitation in all forms ranges from 50 cm at lower elevation to 90 cm at higher elevation. The proportion of precipitation falling as snow, the snow pack accumulation, and the impact of snow melt on runoff increase with elevation. Because the LKF watershed is the highest portion of the RBC watershed, it receives the most snow. We present an LKF mass balance between precipitation and its subsequent distribution as snow accumulation, snow melt, canopy interception, surface storage, evapotranspiration, and infiltration. Preparing the LKF mass balance, involves long-term simulations using the Hydrologic Engineering Center Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS 4.1). For simulating loss, snowmelt, routing, transformation, base flow, and evapotranspiration, HEC-HMS uses these methods: soil moisture accounting (SMA), Temperature index (Degree-day), Muskingum, Clark unit hydrograph, linear recession, and Priestley Taylor, respectively. Preparing HEC-HMS input data involves using ArcGIS to extract soil and other property data from the Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSRUGO), and assuming parameters based upon watershed characteristics and seasonal variability. Calibration produces the set of parameter values that cause simulated values to match observed stream discharge and calculated snow water equivalent (SWE).

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Mar 28th, 4:30 PM Mar 28th, 4:35 PM

Mass balance evaluation of Lower Knowlton Fork (LKF) watershed, Salt Lake County, Utah

Logan Country Club

As a step toward simulating runoff from the entire Red Butte Creek (RBC) watershed, we use continuous precipitation-runoff simulation to prepare a hydrologic mass balance for the Lower Knowlton Fork (LKF) watershed, an RBC sub-watershed. The RBC watershed drains a narrow canyon with steep side walls. RBC flows southwest into the Jordan River, which drains into the Great Salt Lake. Formed from colluvium and alluvium derived from mixed sedimentary rocks, RBC soils are well-drained and have high infiltration rates. Some infiltrated water percolates and becomes groundwater. Groundwater that returns to Red Butte Creek increases the creek’s base flow. And ultimately affects Jordan River flow. RBC watershed elevations range from 1,500 to 2,524m. Annual precipitation in all forms ranges from 50 cm at lower elevation to 90 cm at higher elevation. The proportion of precipitation falling as snow, the snow pack accumulation, and the impact of snow melt on runoff increase with elevation. Because the LKF watershed is the highest portion of the RBC watershed, it receives the most snow. We present an LKF mass balance between precipitation and its subsequent distribution as snow accumulation, snow melt, canopy interception, surface storage, evapotranspiration, and infiltration. Preparing the LKF mass balance, involves long-term simulations using the Hydrologic Engineering Center Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS 4.1). For simulating loss, snowmelt, routing, transformation, base flow, and evapotranspiration, HEC-HMS uses these methods: soil moisture accounting (SMA), Temperature index (Degree-day), Muskingum, Clark unit hydrograph, linear recession, and Priestley Taylor, respectively. Preparing HEC-HMS input data involves using ArcGIS to extract soil and other property data from the Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSRUGO), and assuming parameters based upon watershed characteristics and seasonal variability. Calibration produces the set of parameter values that cause simulated values to match observed stream discharge and calculated snow water equivalent (SWE).