Event Title

Logan River Projects and Expected Water Quality Impacts

Presenter Information

Malgorzata Rycewicz-Borecki

Location

Logan Country Club

Streaming Media

Start Date

3-28-2017 2:10 PM

End Date

3-28-2017 2:15 PM

Description

What we did: Four Logan River projects, located in Cache County, received EPA 319 and Utah NPS funding, and will be implemented from 2016 to 2018. Preliminary concepts were explored by the Logan River Task Force (LRTF). LRTF is composed of a group of about 30 individuals, from professors, government officials, to interest group representatives. Their focus is to make significant contributions to improving and better utilize Logan River, and they have worked diligently to provide economically viable, socially acceptable, environmentally conscious, and generally sustainable solutions to issues on and surrounding Logan River. Together with local environmental consulting firms and the Nature Conservancy, the LRTF has produced a Conservation Action Plan (CAP); compiling 21 goals for over 10 projects along the lower section of Logan River. Preliminary concepts were used to secure funding for water quality improvement projects at Stewart Nature Park, 100 East Residential properties, Golf Course and Rendezvous Park, and 1000 West Agricultural property (Figure 1), and either have been, or are currently being designed in detail. The first example is Stewart Nature Park, where construction began in October 2016. At this location terrace excavation was completed to create a riparian floodplain bench, decrease erosion potential and provide additional riparian habitat. This floodplain bench is approximately 40 feet wide and 350 feet in length. It is scheduled to be planted in spring 2017 with native vegetation. The remaining three projects are slated to begin in summer 2017. The largest of these projects is Rendezvous Park near the Logan River Golf Course. This project will clear fallen trees, dredge sediment, realign the river, build flood berms in a new location, and excavate sediment deposition pools to minimize flooding during high flows. The 100 east residential, and the 1000 west agricultural projects will clear overhanging trees, stabilize the stream bank, and enhance the riparian vegetation. What we found: Water quality improvement projects are a priority for the EPA and the Utah Division of Water Quality. For this reason funding is made available to offset restoration costs. Restoring sections of the river will have a variety of tangible benefits to the water quality of Logan River, and to the citizens of Cache Valley. These projects are expected to improve many of the 21 indicators of river health outlined in the CAP. This poster presentation will list the expected water quality improvements for each of the project restoration efforts (such as decreased temperature, erosion phosphorous concentrations, and flooding potential, and increased riparian habitat, and dissolved oxygen levels). Additionally, the effects of these restoration practices on the 21 CAP indicators will also be presented. Why important: Many riparian areas in the Bear River Watershed, including Logan River, are in need of restoration. Presenting the proposed Logan River restoration designs and their expected outcomes will provide a better understanding of the importance of riparian health, and its effects on water quality, and to recognize the funding opportunities available to offset restoration costs.

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Mar 28th, 2:10 PM Mar 28th, 2:15 PM

Logan River Projects and Expected Water Quality Impacts

Logan Country Club

What we did: Four Logan River projects, located in Cache County, received EPA 319 and Utah NPS funding, and will be implemented from 2016 to 2018. Preliminary concepts were explored by the Logan River Task Force (LRTF). LRTF is composed of a group of about 30 individuals, from professors, government officials, to interest group representatives. Their focus is to make significant contributions to improving and better utilize Logan River, and they have worked diligently to provide economically viable, socially acceptable, environmentally conscious, and generally sustainable solutions to issues on and surrounding Logan River. Together with local environmental consulting firms and the Nature Conservancy, the LRTF has produced a Conservation Action Plan (CAP); compiling 21 goals for over 10 projects along the lower section of Logan River. Preliminary concepts were used to secure funding for water quality improvement projects at Stewart Nature Park, 100 East Residential properties, Golf Course and Rendezvous Park, and 1000 West Agricultural property (Figure 1), and either have been, or are currently being designed in detail. The first example is Stewart Nature Park, where construction began in October 2016. At this location terrace excavation was completed to create a riparian floodplain bench, decrease erosion potential and provide additional riparian habitat. This floodplain bench is approximately 40 feet wide and 350 feet in length. It is scheduled to be planted in spring 2017 with native vegetation. The remaining three projects are slated to begin in summer 2017. The largest of these projects is Rendezvous Park near the Logan River Golf Course. This project will clear fallen trees, dredge sediment, realign the river, build flood berms in a new location, and excavate sediment deposition pools to minimize flooding during high flows. The 100 east residential, and the 1000 west agricultural projects will clear overhanging trees, stabilize the stream bank, and enhance the riparian vegetation. What we found: Water quality improvement projects are a priority for the EPA and the Utah Division of Water Quality. For this reason funding is made available to offset restoration costs. Restoring sections of the river will have a variety of tangible benefits to the water quality of Logan River, and to the citizens of Cache Valley. These projects are expected to improve many of the 21 indicators of river health outlined in the CAP. This poster presentation will list the expected water quality improvements for each of the project restoration efforts (such as decreased temperature, erosion phosphorous concentrations, and flooding potential, and increased riparian habitat, and dissolved oxygen levels). Additionally, the effects of these restoration practices on the 21 CAP indicators will also be presented. Why important: Many riparian areas in the Bear River Watershed, including Logan River, are in need of restoration. Presenting the proposed Logan River restoration designs and their expected outcomes will provide a better understanding of the importance of riparian health, and its effects on water quality, and to recognize the funding opportunities available to offset restoration costs.