Event Title

Numerical Simulation of Near-Surface Soil Water and Heat Transport Under Varied Irrigation Rate and Water Table Depth

Location

Logan Golf & Country Club, Logan, UT

Start Date

3-26-2019 5:00 PM

End Date

3-26-2019 7:00 PM

Description

Surface soil heat flux is one of the key energy balance components of the earth along with net radiation, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux, which depends on evaporation. The earth's energy balance has been well studied, yet errors in surface soil heat flux still need to be reconciled using subsurface measurements. Traditionally the surface soil heat flux is estimated by the sensors buried between 0 and 8 cm, assuming near-surface water and heat dynamics can be represented by one- or two- measurement points. This method has been applied for many years, however, certain conditions would lead to substantial errors when the surface soil moisture is extremely dry/wet, while subsurface soil moisture exhibits opposing conditions by soil drying (evaporation) and wetting (irrigation, precipitation, and water supply from the water table, etc…). We will use numerical simulation of soil hydro- and thermo-dynamics employing different boundary conditions, e.g., irrigation rates and water table depths to demonstrate the associated errors in estimating water and heat fluxes using traditional measurement methods.

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Mar 26th, 5:00 PM Mar 26th, 7:00 PM

Numerical Simulation of Near-Surface Soil Water and Heat Transport Under Varied Irrigation Rate and Water Table Depth

Logan Golf & Country Club, Logan, UT

Surface soil heat flux is one of the key energy balance components of the earth along with net radiation, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux, which depends on evaporation. The earth's energy balance has been well studied, yet errors in surface soil heat flux still need to be reconciled using subsurface measurements. Traditionally the surface soil heat flux is estimated by the sensors buried between 0 and 8 cm, assuming near-surface water and heat dynamics can be represented by one- or two- measurement points. This method has been applied for many years, however, certain conditions would lead to substantial errors when the surface soil moisture is extremely dry/wet, while subsurface soil moisture exhibits opposing conditions by soil drying (evaporation) and wetting (irrigation, precipitation, and water supply from the water table, etc…). We will use numerical simulation of soil hydro- and thermo-dynamics employing different boundary conditions, e.g., irrigation rates and water table depths to demonstrate the associated errors in estimating water and heat fluxes using traditional measurement methods.