Session

Technical Session XI: Mission Lessons II

Abstract

The Digital Imaging Star Camera (DISC) experiment has successfully imaged star fields from the International Space Station (ISS). DISC is a Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) led payload developed jointly by NRL and the Utah State University Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) to advance miniaturized technology for accurate precision pointing knowledge in space which is a critical mission requirement for many scientific and operational payloads. The low size, weight and power (<10x10x10 >cm, <1kg, <1 W) sensing platform that will provide an enhanced pointing capability for nano- and pico- satellite busses. It is flying on the ISS as part of the Air Force Space Test Program STP-H3 flight to provide a proof of concept for DISC experiment. This technology represents a key transition from large, high cost, long-timescale programs to small, low-cost, rapid response science enabling sensing platforms. This paper will focus on the instrument design and on-orbit mission performance.

SSC12-XI-7_presentation.pdf (1877 kB)
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Aug 16th, 12:00 PM

DISC Experiment Overview and On-Orbit Performance Results

The Digital Imaging Star Camera (DISC) experiment has successfully imaged star fields from the International Space Station (ISS). DISC is a Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) led payload developed jointly by NRL and the Utah State University Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) to advance miniaturized technology for accurate precision pointing knowledge in space which is a critical mission requirement for many scientific and operational payloads. The low size, weight and power (<10x10x10>cm, <1kg, <1 W) sensing platform that will provide an enhanced pointing capability for nano- and pico- satellite busses. It is flying on the ISS as part of the Air Force Space Test Program STP-H3 flight to provide a proof of concept for DISC experiment. This technology represents a key transition from large, high cost, long-timescale programs to small, low-cost, rapid response science enabling sensing platforms. This paper will focus on the instrument design and on-orbit mission performance.